The Smoking Ban

Discussion in 'General Business Forum' started by lightload, Jun 21, 2007.

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  1. asonda

    asonda UKBF Big Shot Full Member - Verified Business

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    Ofcourse I could!

    This is a good tip, Somebody I knew smoked, (no he's still alive, just lost contact), he had forgot to put his nicotine patch on in the morning before work, so he cut up a square of sellotape, and stuck it where he'd normally put his patch, the mind thought he had a patch on, didn't have a craving all day....

    That then allowed him to get off the patches, for a full smoke free recovery!
     
    Posted: Jun 21, 2007 By: asonda Member since: Jan 28, 2007
    #21
  2. CarolineICE

    CarolineICE UKBF Newcomer Free Member

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    I agree! But you sound like my Mum!

    I know all the implications...to my health, finance etc etc but I still do it! Why?

    (said in a small voice in fear of being ridiculed...I do enjoy it!....sorry!):(
     
    Posted: Jun 21, 2007 By: CarolineICE Member since: Jul 19, 2006
    #22
  3. CarolineICE

    CarolineICE UKBF Newcomer Free Member

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    Ha! A friend of mine who smoked more in a day than the average man in a month used to wear two full strength nicotine patches and still smoke over 40 a day, apparently they liked the hit! That is extreme I know.

    To be honest I like to think that I could give up through sheer will power but I have to have a switch in my brain that says ' Caroline you silly bint, give up!' Even though my husband says this on a daily basis! I'm not that bad though, I am sure I am not the only one here who smokes!
     
    Posted: Jun 21, 2007 By: CarolineICE Member since: Jul 19, 2006
    #23
  4. asonda

    asonda UKBF Big Shot Full Member - Verified Business

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    no but I bet your in a minority
     
    Posted: Jun 21, 2007 By: asonda Member since: Jan 28, 2007
    #24
  5. CarolineICE

    CarolineICE UKBF Newcomer Free Member

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    Absolutely, which is why the smoking ban is a good thing if it can encourage more people to give up by making it socially unacceptable. I am for it. Wish me luck!
     
    Posted: Jun 21, 2007 By: CarolineICE Member since: Jul 19, 2006
    #25
  6. Cornish Steve

    Cornish Steve UKBF Newcomer Full Member

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    I've never smoked, I hate smoking, and I hate the smell that lingers in hotel rooms etc. I am pleased that the Marriott hotel chain now has a complete ban on smoking in all its hotels. As a frequent traveller, they gain more of my custom.

    However....

    The smoking ban is a worrying trend. There's a balance between the rights of the individual and the role of government imposing its views on society. Communist governments, for example, dictate not only what behaviour is acceptable but also what views are. Clearly, that oversteps the bounds.

    I have no problem with private companies, such as the Marriott hotel chain, imposing a smoking ban for its properties. Restaurants, pubs, theatres, trains, taxis, football stadiums, etc. are free to do the same. Depending on their clientele, they'll win some business and lose some. Neither do I have a problem with employers banning smoking in the workplace; employees can choose to work there or not. It's quite another matter for the government to decide what's best for us. While I may be in the minority, I disagree strongly.

    This thread is revealing. If you don't smoke, you agree with the ban; if you do smoke, you disagree with the ban (although there are exceptions). What does that tell me? The rights of individuals are becoming subservient to majority opinion. And majority opinion, over time, can be manipulated by government and the media. It's a slippery slope, folks, and it doesn't lead to Utopia.

    Bans by the government sound just fine until they affect something that you particularly enjoy. Should a majority, who happen to differ from you in their opinions, be allowed to get their way and force you to stop? "But it's good for you..."!
     
    Posted: Jun 21, 2007 By: Cornish Steve Member since: Jul 4, 2005
    #26
  7. asonda

    asonda UKBF Big Shot Full Member - Verified Business

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    Steve, why do you always have to write posts that make me think!

    It's true, but the thing is, Smoking is bad for someones health, so in this case, I think it's right that the government is putting in measures, If they were banning something that didn't matter, I'm sure it would be a different outcome in relation to opinions!
     
    Posted: Jun 21, 2007 By: asonda Member since: Jan 28, 2007
    #27
  8. CarolineICE

    CarolineICE UKBF Newcomer Free Member

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    Steve,

    As ever you give a balanced view and I agree in part with what you are saying. However as an intelligent person who is a smoker (a disparity already!) I feel that by making my bad habit unacceptable in todays society then it will make me more likely to give up. I don't like smoking, I enjoy it. I can see the harm that it can do but I still do it. Why? I don't know.I don't oppose the ban but I can see where the Human Rights argument comes into play. However, what I don't understand is how anyone can stand up for smokers as all the evidence is stacked against those who smoke!
     
    Posted: Jun 21, 2007 By: CarolineICE Member since: Jul 19, 2006
    #28
  9. Cornish Steve

    Cornish Steve UKBF Newcomer Full Member

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    No more hamburgers - not good for you. No more beer - not good for you. No more doughnuts - not good for you. No more fast cars - not good for you. No more motorcycles - not good for you. No more sunbathing - not good for you. No more video games - not good for you. No more Emmerdale - not good for you. Need I go on?

    What's next? No more Political Party X - not good for us. No more criticism of public figures by the media - not good for us. No more talk radio programs - not good for us....
     
    Posted: Jun 21, 2007 By: Cornish Steve Member since: Jul 4, 2005
    #29
  10. asonda

    asonda UKBF Big Shot Full Member - Verified Business

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    People that stand up for them, are general people who don't like what they hear...it's like people being told the truth, but they just don't want to hear it, so they fight back...
     
    Posted: Jun 21, 2007 By: asonda Member since: Jan 28, 2007
    #30
  11. Tin

    Tin Just an SEO Staff Member

    5,864 1,610
    Because he's very good at that. Good post Steve:)
     
    Posted: Jun 21, 2007 By: Tin Member since: Nov 14, 2005
    #31
  12. Cornish Steve

    Cornish Steve UKBF Newcomer Full Member

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    I don't stand up for smoking; I hate the practice. I do, however, stand up for the right of individuals to choose to smoke. They know the harm it can do, but that's true of many things in life. I don't stand up for couch potatoes; however, I do stand up for the right of any individual not to exercise. The health implications are again clear, but it's their choice.

    ...as long as the habit concerned doesn't unduly affect my rights as an individual! And, for smoking, that is an issue.

    What about the bus driver today in the US? He stopped the bus and asked two lesbians to get off because they were kissing passionately in front of all the passengers. For sure, I can imagine that some people, especially with young children, may have been upset. Did the behaviour of the girls infringe on the rights of others? Was the bus driver infringing on their rights (which is how it was ruled)? These are not easy questions to answer.
     
    Posted: Jun 21, 2007 By: Cornish Steve Member since: Jul 4, 2005
    #32
  13. asonda

    asonda UKBF Big Shot Full Member - Verified Business

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    No more beer - I wouldn't care, as it is a health risk... I'm young, never been involved in drinking, and don't intend to start! ofcouse that is my view though!

    Those instances though are different than Smoking though, Smoking is an addiction, and as an addiction people don't want to just stop! which is why interference here is a good thing!
     
    Posted: Jun 21, 2007 By: asonda Member since: Jan 28, 2007
    #33
  14. asonda

    asonda UKBF Big Shot Full Member - Verified Business

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    If you drink beer, you drink beer, if you drink lots your an alcoholic!

    If you smoke lots or not much, your a smoker......but beer to turns into an addiction at the alcoholism stage..and thats where they get help.

    Smoking, is an addiction from the start...
     
    Posted: Jun 21, 2007 By: asonda Member since: Jan 28, 2007
    #34
  15. Cornish Steve

    Cornish Steve UKBF Newcomer Full Member

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    Bringing this back to the topic of business, we can most definitely adapt to the latest trends in society. A good example is the current obsession about all things green. The example of Marriott hotels banning smoking is another. Is there a case to be made for a restaurant or a football stadium banning the drinking of alcohol?
     
    Posted: Jun 21, 2007 By: Cornish Steve Member since: Jul 4, 2005
    #35
  16. asonda

    asonda UKBF Big Shot Full Member - Verified Business

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    Alcohol is a depressent, therefore causes anger with football hooligans, which cause those massive fights! There's one for you!

    To be honest, Alcohol, Smoking, should be banned completely, we know we shouldn't do it as a society but still do, and many want to stop, banning it completely then doesn't let us have that cheeky smoke, or get plastered and start fighting at fottie matches!
     
    Posted: Jun 21, 2007 By: asonda Member since: Jan 28, 2007
    #36
  17. Rhyl Lightworks

    Rhyl Lightworks UKBF Ace Free Member

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    First let me declare an interest that I am a smoker, albeit not a proud one. It would be easy to blame the tobacco companies for my addiction, and although I think they must accept part of the guilt, I accept that the bulk of the blame lies with me. My partner is a counsellor with an organisation helping people with drug and alcohol addiction. He tells me that it is easier to give up say heroin than nicotine, and alcohol addiction is on a par with nicotine, but probably causes more harm in society. For historical reasons, we ban certain drugs, tolerate nicotine and, it seems to me, positively encourage alcohol consumption. If we were starting from scratch today, it would be logical to ban or allow all three. I do not see the logic of a ban on smoking in public places, but no action at all on alcohol.
    As usual, governments have pussy-footed around the problem. If they made tobacco illegal altogether, it would force the majority of smokers, including myself, to stop smoking. It would simply be too much trouble and too risky to seek out supplies on the black market. True there would be a black market, as there is with drugs, but smoking would be a much reduced pastime. It may even have a beneficial effect, in inducing young people to rebel by taking to tobacco, rather than other drugs. I would certainly prefer a child of mine to be a tobacco user than say a heroin user. By allowing cigarettes to be still legally available, people like me will continue to use them in our own homes, and hiding in corners.
    Could it be that governments are afraid of the outcry from tobacco companies and newsagents? A rhetorical question, I fear.
    And as for alcohol - it seems that it is so deeply ingrained in our culture, no-one is ever going to have the courage to do anything about it. How depressing (pardon the pun).
    Barrie
     
    Posted: Jun 22, 2007 By: Rhyl Lightworks Member since: Aug 16, 2006
    #37
  18. Coding Monkey

    Coding Monkey UKBF Ace Free Member

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    Steve, imagine now if a new drug was released with half the properties that are present in cigarettes. The drug would probably struggle to get behind even a hypothetical, let alone put into serious testing to go on to be sold to the public. It damages your health. It damages the health of those around you. It has addictive chemicals within it, which have mind altering effects. Drinking beer, doesn't by default have an impact on people standing close to you; neither does eating a hamburger. I choose to be a vegetarian, and have no problem if anyone wishes to go to McDonalds. But, I cannot choose to have a physical dislike for smoking.

    Supposedly 600,000 people have pledged to give up smoking on the 1st July. If even half of those people do that, and as a result live longer, how is the ban a bad thing? I already have friends who have recently given up just before the 1st July, as a result.

    There's a distinct difference between the enjoyment of one, to the detriment of the other; and in this case, the majority. I'm sure some people enjoy child abuse too.
     
    Posted: Jun 22, 2007 By: Coding Monkey Member since: Dec 8, 2005
    #38
  19. coxadmin

    coxadmin UKBF Newcomer Free Member

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    I am looking forward to the smoking ban - I'm a non-smoking (never even tried one) asthma sufferer. I'd like to see the ban go even further - no smoking in any public place, just limited to private houses!

    Ten years ago I had a job I loved - the only reason I left was that the company went bust. I was in a minority of non-smokers - 2 non-smokers and 6 smokers - and the office building stank, my clothes stank, my hair stank. I needed my inhaler a lot more while I worked there.

    I hate going out for a meal or a drink and coming home stinking like an ashtray and with a tight chest - sometimes I've had to leave social events early because the cigarette smoke inflames my asthma.

    Even walking in town and people puff their cigarette smoke in my face - it's disgusting.
     
    Posted: Jun 22, 2007 By: coxadmin Member since: Nov 5, 2004
    #39
  20. weddingcrafter

    weddingcrafter UKBF Newcomer Free Member

    317 9
    I fully support the smoking ban.

    But I am as irritated as hell about the rule which says I now need to display a no smoking poster (of a specified size - how much did they pay someone to decide THAT) in my premises. Its a 600sq ft office for Pete's sake and no-one has ever been allowed to smoke in it.

    Rant over.
     
    Posted: Jun 22, 2007 By: weddingcrafter Member since: Sep 2, 2005
    #40
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