How to advertise After School Club

Discussion in 'Sales, Marketing & PR' started by Ali_SA, Jan 18, 2018.

  1. Ali_SA

    Ali_SA UKBF Newcomer Free Member

    Posts: 23 Likes: 1
    Hi all,

    I have set up an after-school club where we teach kids how to make video games and animations.
    I'm having a difficult time advertising and marketing my business.

    The thing is, millions of my (potential) customers go into these buildings called "School" every single day! So i know the distance between me and millions of potential customers is a simple gate, however right now it seems easier to break into a bank than go past that gate.

    School's don't seem to care about any of our phone calls and e-mails, and never respond back to us.
    So what we did try to do was to stand outside schools just before students are about to go home and hand out leaflets to them. Some schools didn't mind that, some schools nagged a bit and just let us get on with it (as we're on public streets), and some other schools actively tried to stop us (by either asking us to leave, or by taking the leaflets away from the students).

    So my question is, what's the best way to advertise an after school program?

    Thanks a lot!
     
    Posted: Jan 18, 2018 By: Ali_SA Member since: Aug 31, 2016
    #1
  2. Mr D

    Mr D UKBF Big Shot Free Member

    Posts: 4,986 Likes: 484
    Parents.
    Go where the parents are, advertise where the parents see or read.
    What are you offering the school? Gain their interest rather than just wanting their time.
     
    Posted: Jan 18, 2018 By: Mr D Member since: Feb 12, 2017
    #2
  3. Ali_SA

    Ali_SA UKBF Newcomer Free Member

    Posts: 23 Likes: 1
    How can I access the parents? Do you know of any parents meeting or gathering outside of schools I could visit?

    My main job is being a university lecturer. So I can go to schools and do a talk on why studying games design can be a good career choice. But problem is, schools don't reply back. The process is:
    1. I call the schools
    2. Schools ask to send an e-mail
    3. I send and e-mail and never hear back from them
    4. Call the school back after a week, they say they will get back to me if they're interested (and they never do)
     
    Posted: Jan 18, 2018 By: Ali_SA Member since: Aug 31, 2016
    #3
  4. AllUpHere

    AllUpHere UKBF Ace Free Member

    Posts: 2,340 Likes: 809
    Did you prepare any sort of marketing plan when starting the business?
     
    Posted: Jan 18, 2018 By: AllUpHere Member since: Jun 30, 2014
    #4
  5. BenKirkwood

    BenKirkwood UKBF Regular Full Member

    Posts: 294 Likes: 48
    Social Media is your friend here, get yourself a Facebook account, join some local area groups (my area has several gossip groups) You don't need to be too formal about ads. Make yourself a "Page" on FB where people can connect with you. Post some of the cool stuff the kids come up with - you'll be turning people away in no time.
     
    Posted: Jan 18, 2018 By: BenKirkwood Member since: Aug 4, 2010
    #5
  6. Ali_SA

    Ali_SA UKBF Newcomer Free Member

    Posts: 23 Likes: 1
    In all honestly, I didn't.
    The way the business got up and running was from a very simple idea. We did some leafleting outside some school and got a number of reposes and that's how we got started. But the issue with that is, first of all you never know if the school would try to stop you for leafleting, and if they are OK with you doing so, only about a maximum of 5 students would get in touch (but of course we need much bigger numbers).

    What would be an ideal marketing plan?
     
    Posted: Jan 18, 2018 By: Ali_SA Member since: Aug 31, 2016
    #6
  7. Ali_SA

    Ali_SA UKBF Newcomer Free Member

    Posts: 23 Likes: 1
    What do you mean Local area groups? What would I be looking for on Facebook? You mean just look up "Gossip Groups in ......"?
     
    Posted: Jan 18, 2018 By: Ali_SA Member since: Aug 31, 2016
    #7
  8. AllUpHere

    AllUpHere UKBF Ace Free Member

    Posts: 2,340 Likes: 809
    That's too broad a question to answer.
    Make a start by researching the difference between push and pull marketing strategy. I have a feeling you are pushing when you'd have much more luck pulling.
     
    Posted: Jan 18, 2018 By: AllUpHere Member since: Jun 30, 2014
    #8
  9. Mr D

    Mr D UKBF Big Shot Free Member

    Posts: 4,986 Likes: 484

    You could leaflet the houses around the schools. You could advertise in the local press. Social media.
    If you want the schools to get involved then make it worth their while. It sounds like you want them to do something and not offering anything to the school.

    Perhaps the school isn't interested. So generate interest.
     
    Posted: Jan 18, 2018 By: Mr D Member since: Feb 12, 2017
    #9
  10. BenKirkwood

    BenKirkwood UKBF Regular Full Member

    Posts: 294 Likes: 48
    In my local Facebook region (and I'm sure its the same all over the country), there are groups for everything. My local "gossip" groups are full of whiners, people begging for help or whatever BUT they have a lot of members, it's not all negative conversations and most don't mind the odd post about your local business, especially if its related to the kids.

    Some groups allow you to post an ad, some don't; it doesn't really matter - you asked how to get in front of the parents. You have a social business/club and in today's world, most of the parents, if not the kids themselves are social media junkies.

    It's a quagmire of stuff to learn if you don't normally use social media yourself but only if you overthink it - you need do nothing more than join some of the local active groups and introduce yourself and your club - that's it, you'll be in front of more parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles and friends than you can shake a stick at.

    Prepare yourself! Create a "page" for your club so people can like and follow you. Go nuts posting all the positive outcomes. Get your club members and parents to share in their social circles.

    Rinse and Repeat

    I'm not saying this is the only channel you could use but I'd be surprised if you didn't spark a lot of interest.

    HTH Paul.
     
    Posted: Jan 18, 2018 By: BenKirkwood Member since: Aug 4, 2010
    #10
  11. CharlotteS

    CharlotteS UKBF Contributor Full Member

    Posts: 52 Likes: 9
    Facebook ads are your friend here. I work with a lot of schools and basically thmeir target audience is also yours - we have run email, google and Facebook campaigns and by far Facebook always has the best impact
     
    Posted: Jan 18, 2018 By: CharlotteS Member since: Aug 30, 2017
    #11
  12. jibbajabba

    jibbajabba UKBF Contributor Free Member

    Posts: 31 Likes: 1
    What age group are you targetting?
     
    Posted: Jan 19, 2018 By: jibbajabba Member since: Dec 29, 2017
    #12
  13. jibbajabba

    jibbajabba UKBF Contributor Free Member

    Posts: 31 Likes: 1
    So council is your best bet and renting a room in the school then the school will be more open to having you advertise.
    Parent associations are good.
    what about the afterschool club in the school if they have one.

    make your pitch about childcare as well, as much as parents love the activities they are very very aware of the extra hour to get the shopping in/start dinner etc
     
    Posted: Jan 19, 2018 By: jibbajabba Member since: Dec 29, 2017
    #13
  14. ethical PR

    ethical PR UKBF Legend Free Member

    Posts: 6,457 Likes: 1,428
    You have asked this question on here several times already and been given advice.

    You have been advised that it is not a good strategy to annoy your key channel of advertising your service by standing outside the school and giving out leaflets when they don't want you to do this.

    Why not invest in advertising in school newsletters, on school websites and by having a stand at school fairs.

    You can also advertise in local magazines/websites aimed at families.
     
    Posted: Jan 19, 2018 By: ethical PR Member since: Apr 19, 2009
    #14
  15. deanpunchard

    deanpunchard UKBF Regular Full Member

    Posts: 139 Likes: 24
    You say you've called and emailed them, but have you been into reception and talked to someone?

    I set up a football club for players, and never had any problems with the school. I printed out 100s of leaflets, and they gladly gave them to the classes and children.
    Now of course I'm doing this 100% as a volunteer, and never take any money from this, so perhaps that's the difference.

    But as has been mentioned, a lot of schools have advertising space in newsletters and websites.

    Also, could you go into the schools and give a free demo? Perhaps an afternoon, get them excited, then give them details about the club.

    Final thought, have you looked at the curriculum for the school. Does your class benefit the children and school? Could your class raise the grades of children in computing, science, maths, English, etc?
     
    Posted: Jan 19, 2018 By: deanpunchard Member since: Dec 30, 2012
    #15
  16. BenKirkwood

    BenKirkwood UKBF Regular Full Member

    Posts: 294 Likes: 48
    @Ali_SA I just found and skimmed through your previous threads on this same question. You've had some excellent and detailed answers to your question, so why ask it again, and again and again? Couldn't you just follow some of the excellent advice being given?
     
    Posted: Jan 19, 2018 By: BenKirkwood Member since: Aug 4, 2010
    #16
  17. Ali_SA

    Ali_SA UKBF Newcomer Free Member

    Posts: 23 Likes: 1
    We're targeting 9 to 16 year olds
     
    Posted: Jan 19, 2018 By: Ali_SA Member since: Aug 31, 2016
    #17
  18. Ali_SA

    Ali_SA UKBF Newcomer Free Member

    Posts: 23 Likes: 1
    Thanks for the reply.
    We did try leafleting near by houses. Spent about £700 on that and the result was obtaining 2 students (each who would pay £150). So it was a loss and we stopped doing that.

    I do offer schools something in return, and that is information (I'm not sure if that's not good enough?)
    Being a University Lecturer, I have offered to go in and deliver a free lecture for their students and inform them about the industry. Maybe this isn't good enough to offer to them?
     
    Posted: Jan 19, 2018 By: Ali_SA Member since: Aug 31, 2016
    #18
  19. Ali_SA

    Ali_SA UKBF Newcomer Free Member

    Posts: 23 Likes: 1
    Maybe I've been doing it wrong.
    I've spent about £500 on Facebook Ads, and never got a single response. And it's quite strange, because Facebook's statistics on how many people have clicked on my ad is very different to how many people have visited my website (FB stats are a lot higher).
    Maybe I've used it wrong, but I've been very careful to target a very specific audience (i.e. age, location, etc.)
     
    Posted: Jan 19, 2018 By: Ali_SA Member since: Aug 31, 2016
    #19
  20. ethical PR

    ethical PR UKBF Legend Free Member

    Posts: 6,457 Likes: 1,428

    Have you advertised using any of the channels I have suggested in an earlier post.

    I disagree with Charlotte just because FB might work for schools, who have an engaged audience. Doesn't mean it will work for you.
     
    Posted: Jan 19, 2018 By: ethical PR Member since: Apr 19, 2009
    #20