Employee satisfaction

Discussion in 'Employment & HR' started by Becky Young, Feb 8, 2019.

  1. Becky Young

    Becky Young UKBF Newcomer Free Member

    20 1
    Why have I never worked for a single employer who understands the very simple premise that if you keep your employees happy they will work harder for you? Too many employers are out there grinding their employees down and wondering why their staff turnover is so high and their productivity is low! It makes absolute sense to me and yet I get looked at with blank stares when I try to explain this to senior management and suggest ways that we could improve!
     
    Posted: Feb 8, 2019 By: Becky Young Member since: Feb 8, 2019
    #1
  2. Blaby Loyal

    Blaby Loyal UKBF Ace Full Member

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    Because it's an employers' market I'm afraid. If you don't like it, they can replace you at the drop of a hat. It is possibly something that their 'business model' is built around.

    No point in fighting a situation like that, you'll find yourself a lone voice in a very dense, dark forest.
     
    Posted: Feb 8, 2019 By: Blaby Loyal Member since: Jun 12, 2018
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  3. AllUpHere

    AllUpHere UKBF Ace Free Member

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    As Blaby says above, employees are very easily replaced. One's who deserve to be looked after, or are truly valuable, will be treated as such. Anyone who thinks they can moan their way to better treatment will be treated with the contempt they deserve.
     
    Posted: Feb 8, 2019 By: AllUpHere Member since: Jun 30, 2014
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  4. Becky Young

    Becky Young UKBF Newcomer Free Member

    20 1
    But it's actually in their interests to treat their staff well! True you can go on replacing people if you so wish, but your business is going to much less successful as a result and you're never going to find experienced, skilled and dedicated employees with that attitude because employees that are worth their salt know their worth.
     
    Posted: Feb 8, 2019 By: Becky Young Member since: Feb 8, 2019
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  5. Becky Young

    Becky Young UKBF Newcomer Free Member

    20 1
    I'm not trying to moan my way into better treatment. I am management. I'm trying to negotiate some cost effective perks for my staff that will raise their morale and erradicate some of the misery I currently see on their faces daily. They are sluggish and unproductive because they are made to feel undervalued.
     
    Posted: Feb 8, 2019 By: Becky Young Member since: Feb 8, 2019
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  6. AllUpHere

    AllUpHere UKBF Ace Free Member

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    What industry are you in? What do the staff do?
     
    Posted: Feb 8, 2019 By: AllUpHere Member since: Jun 30, 2014
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  7. Becky Young

    Becky Young UKBF Newcomer Free Member

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    It's a large marketing firm so we have staff of varying skill sets and job roles
     
    Posted: Feb 8, 2019 By: Becky Young Member since: Feb 8, 2019
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  8. AllUpHere

    AllUpHere UKBF Ace Free Member

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    The last thing they need is management trying to cheer them up with silly perks. If they all turn up for work with 'misery on their faces' you employed the wrong people.
     
    Posted: Feb 8, 2019 By: AllUpHere Member since: Jun 30, 2014
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  9. Becky Young

    Becky Young UKBF Newcomer Free Member

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    Totally disagree. The odd staff lunch out or team building day costs very little, but it builds relationships and enhances experience. Happier staff members with a stronger connection to their employers and colleagues are ten times more productive than those that feel undervalued.
     
    Posted: Feb 8, 2019 By: Becky Young Member since: Feb 8, 2019
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  10. Becky Young

    Becky Young UKBF Newcomer Free Member

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    And if you think that team building is a 'silly perk' then how about decent sickness cover, maternity packages, travel expenses covered . . . that kind of thing?
     
    Posted: Feb 8, 2019 By: Becky Young Member since: Feb 8, 2019
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  11. AllUpHere

    AllUpHere UKBF Ace Free Member

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    We aren't going to agree on this. I can't think of anything worse than a team building day being forced upon me by a junior manager who thinks it's a good idea. If I ever lost my marbles and decided to get a job, top priority would be to work somewhere that frowned upon such things. In creative industries it's also become a cliché that the worst design agencies have pool tables, arcade games and other such nonsense in a vain attempt to be 'fun' employers.

    You'll be encouraging staff to spend their evenings with their colleagues bowling or go carting next. :)

    Having said that, your other suggestions do seem more appealing. When my other half worked, she was pleased her employer provided benefits including Bupa cover etc. What she enjoyed the most though, was a big fat Christmas bonus.
     
    Posted: Feb 8, 2019 By: AllUpHere Member since: Jun 30, 2014
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  12. AstEver

    AstEver UKBF Contributor Free Member

    54 6
    Another reason can be that the causal correlation is difficult for HR people to present in a spreadsheet (and no wonder), and therefore it is difficult for employers to understand and believe in it. Also, employers can think it 'an inane HR stuff' full of cliches and naivety that has its place only in corporations.
     
    Posted: Feb 8, 2019 By: AstEver Member since: Jan 10, 2019
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  13. Becky Young

    Becky Young UKBF Newcomer Free Member

    20 1
    Adding 'big fat Christmas bonus' to the list of ideas.

    It's just about feeling valued, whatever that looks like to the vast majority. It doesn't take a genius to figure out that if staff are unhappy they'll leave. And a high staff turnover is bad for productivity, as is a slow workforce that don't care.
     
    Posted: Feb 8, 2019 By: Becky Young Member since: Feb 8, 2019
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  14. Becky Young

    Becky Young UKBF Newcomer Free Member

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    This makes a lot of sense. So what I need is a way to present this as fact in a spreadsheet . . . you've given me an idea! Thank you!
     
    Posted: Feb 8, 2019 By: Becky Young Member since: Feb 8, 2019
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  15. AllUpHere

    AllUpHere UKBF Ace Free Member

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    You do need to be careful raising staff expectations. Things like bonuses can become expected very easily. I remember having my brother moan for what seemed like hours about the fact that he only got a Christmas bonus of about 45 grand. Reason being, he normally got twice that, so the 45 seemed like a bit of a slap in the face.
     
    Posted: Feb 8, 2019 By: AllUpHere Member since: Jun 30, 2014
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  16. Becky Young

    Becky Young UKBF Newcomer Free Member

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    Christ alive! What on earth does your brother do?! I'd keel over with shock (in a good way) if I got a bonus of 45K!
     
    Posted: Feb 8, 2019 By: Becky Young Member since: Feb 8, 2019
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  17. AllUpHere

    AllUpHere UKBF Ace Free Member

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    At the time he was the vice president of a particular department of an oil company. My point was, because he was used to a much larger bonus, even a 45 grand payment annoyed him. Exactly the same would be true of a much smaller (but regular) bonus.
     
    Posted: Feb 8, 2019 By: AllUpHere Member since: Jun 30, 2014
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  18. Becky Young

    Becky Young UKBF Newcomer Free Member

    20 1
    What if we made the bonus performance based? Has the potential to put more backs up, but could also motivate to perform well. Alternatively we have to commit to a figure we know we can sustain. That's if they even go for it. I think you're right, to half a person's usual regular bonus is always going to seem like an insult.
     
    Posted: Feb 8, 2019 By: Becky Young Member since: Feb 8, 2019
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  19. AstEver

    AstEver UKBF Contributor Free Member

    54 6
    I used spreadsheet as a metaphor :) for measurement and business case.
    I'm afraid that if you tell your senior management about making people happy and how this will make the company thrive, it sounds to them like a utopia. It is a huge task that is going to take years. Divide the task into small projects and then start bundling them up.

    I agree with AllUpHere in regards to silly perks, imposed (and superficial) activities, and the games in workplace fad, etc.

    Does the company have an HR strategy? What does happy people mean to you, management and the people themselves? You have asked a very general question expecting a very specific answer.

    You may be interested in Change Management, Resistance to Change, Organisational Development and HR metrics. Nevertheless, I would start from developing the strategy.
    I made slides some time ago regarding overcoming senior management resistance to change, which I can send you if you want.
     
    Posted: Feb 8, 2019 By: AstEver Member since: Jan 10, 2019
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  20. Mr D

    Mr D UKBF Legend Free Member

    14,956 1,630
    Costs quite a bit.
    Went on a team building day once, it was £200 per staff member who was booked on it and the dippy manager had not factored in maternity leave or honeymoon so 3 staff who were booked in for it could not attend.
    Was irrelevant to the organisation, didn't do anything for the team and looking at the produced stats there was no difference in clearance rate.

    To be honest some of the best employers I have had simply left staff to get on with stuff. An occasional 'good job' doesn't go amiss, neither does a bonus of £20 in the occasional month when particular targets are exceeded. But overall cannot say I have ever done anything with a team that made things at work any different.
     
    Posted: Feb 8, 2019 By: Mr D Member since: Feb 12, 2017
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