inc after a business name

Discussion in 'Legal' started by UKSBD, Jan 6, 2010.

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  1. UKSBD

    UKSBD Not a real duck Staff Member

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    I assume inc. after a business name stands for incorporated?
    Are there any restrictions on using inc?
     
    Posted: Jan 6, 2010 By: UKSBD Member since: Dec 30, 2005
    #1
  2. DotNetWebs

    DotNetWebs UKBF Legend Full Member

    5,014 1,001
    Isn't that a term used for companies incorporated in the USA?

    I would guess that as with 'Ltd' you are only permitted to use it if your are actually incorporated.

    Regards

    Dotty
     
    Posted: Jan 6, 2010 By: DotNetWebs Member since: Feb 16, 2005
    #2
  3. Gratis Guidance

    Gratis Guidance UKBF Newcomer Free Member

    201 45
    Its an American term, we use Limited in the UK, which is only legal after you have registered your company name at companies house

    I don't think there is a legal restriction on using inc. in the UK, but it doesn't mean anything, and you may find some people will get confused by your legal status!
     
    Posted: Jan 6, 2010 By: Gratis Guidance Member since: Mar 20, 2009
    #3
  4. UKSBD

    UKSBD Not a real duck Staff Member

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    I've just had a business register in my directory using it after their name,
    quick search at companies house doesn't find them, so just wondering if
    they are breaking any regulations?
     
    Posted: Jan 6, 2010 By: UKSBD Member since: Dec 30, 2005
    #4
  5. mhall

    mhall UKBF Ace Free Member

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    As they are not incorporated I would suggest that, at the very least, they are making themselves look silly unless they are using it tongue in cheek like "Monsters Inc"
    I am not aware of any specific law but I would personally say they are guilty of using misleading advertising as you could say they are attempting to mislead the public into making them believe they are incorporated
     
    Posted: Jan 6, 2010 By: mhall Member since: Sep 8, 2009
    #5
  6. VeryMark

    VeryMark UKBF Newcomer Free Member

    1,610 235
    I am not aware of any specific prohibition on, or regulation of, use of the terms "inc" or "incorporated" in this country.

    However, it might possibly be argued that use of either of these terms in the name of an unincorporated business could be be misleading under the new legislation which replaced the Trade Descriptions Act 1968, which was brought in under the EU Unfair Commercial Practices Directive (Dir 2005/29/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 11 May 2005 concerning unfair business-to-consumer commercial practices in the internal market and amending Council Dir 84/450/EEC, Dirs 97/7/EC, 98/27/EC, and 2002/65/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council and Regulation (EC) No 2006/2004 of the European Parliament and of the Council).

    This new legislation takes the form of two implementing statutory instruments, namely The Business Protection from Misleading Marketing Regulations and The Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations.

    It is therefore possible that a complaint might result in action by a local trading standards officer, as the two statutory instruments in question are so wide and vague in scope as to potentially catch use of any business description or terminology which might perhaps be misleading.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2010
    Posted: Jan 6, 2010 By: VeryMark Member since: Sep 20, 2004
    #6
  7. Ozzy

    Ozzy Quite simply, me. Full Member - Verified Business

    3,401 157
    Are they listing themselves as a UK based business? If so, then it is possible that Philip's comments come into play.

    If they are listing themselves as an American company, then they very well could be a US registered company. However, as you are a UK directory then I suspect the former.
     
    Posted: Jan 7, 2010 By: Ozzy Member since: Feb 9, 2003
    #7
  8. UKSBD

    UKSBD Not a real duck Staff Member

    9,243 1,731
    It's a british business, but from looking at website just looks like a kid or
    a bedroom business.

    Can't see any harm in leaving the listing up, I was more intrigued than
    anything else as to whether there are any regs on using inc.
     
    Posted: Jan 7, 2010 By: UKSBD Member since: Dec 30, 2005
    #8
  9. Cornish Steve

    Cornish Steve UKBF Newcomer Full Member

    14,858 2,117
    Sounds like an American company with maybe a local office in Britain.
     
    Posted: Jan 7, 2010 By: Cornish Steve Member since: Jul 4, 2005
    #9
  10. estwig

    estwig UKBF Legend Free Member

    12,225 4,272
    It's not Mystery.inc is it??

    ;)
     
    Posted: Jan 7, 2010 By: estwig Member since: Sep 29, 2006
    #10
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