Wizemail provides email marketing software solutions and e-shot HTML templates to a wide variety of clients - SMEs, Corporate and Digital Advertising Agencies alike – all with one common requirement, a dynamic, professional, digital marketing team on hand when required.

At least weekly, one of the Wizemail team will post a tip, trick or general email marketing advice here.

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  • Admit It; You Will Never Be Green Oct 15, 2019

    Social media is going through one of its periods of attacks on false claims of being green. We should accept that it is impossible for email marketing to be completely green in the sense of having no environmental impact. Servers, the requirement for precious metals giving the need for mines, plastics everywhere and transport of goods, would require a forest or two to negate the impact.

    Because of presentations to the UN by a young, charismatic environmentalist, being carbon neutral and the need for recycling has been in the news almost constantly over recent weeks. Even Brexit has had to fight against it for headlines.

    Whether or not you accept the proposition that global warming is man-made is immaterial. Being profligate with resources can have a negative impact on your profits. Whilst Amazon has ridden the social media criticism of its packaging, a smaller company might have taken a serious knock.

    Regardless of the rights and wrongs of activists, ignoring the pressure to go green might well result in your company being ‘outed’. Profits in email marketing are tight enough without scoring an own goal. The bottom line is profit. Is lowering your environmental impact an earner?

    The opportunities for something to boast of will vary depending on your product. One instance which is rather obvious, so much so that it features in headlines repeatedly, is ink cartridges. Complex plastic creations heading for landfill will negate a lot of positives you might implement.

    The problem is that you can’t make any claim in an email marketing campaign of vague community responsibility when sending out cartridges packed in vast volumes of plastic. Using recyclable paper instead is a good step, but it is not enough to suggest a conversion.

    Any claim of being green must be evidence based. Say precisely what you have done and itemise its positive effects. Don’t even think of using the word green as it is red rag material. It’s devalued in any case. If you can show you’ve reduced the volume of packaging by 15%, then that’s all you should say.

    On the other hand, broadcast the positives and show you’re proud of them. ​

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  • Always Modify An Email Template Oct 15, 2019

    I don’t like being prescriptive, but it is not a good idea to use an email marketing template ‘straight out of the box’. It will have been designed by a professional, and as you’ve had no graphic art experience, you might not feel the need to prove it by messing it up.

    There’s only so much a professional designer can do without knowing those on your email marketing lists. That’s where you come in. It’s up to you to add those final little twists to the template which will not only make it just right for you, but just right for your subscribers. There are basic traps to avoid though.

    1/ Balance

    You need to ensure you get the relative proportions of text and images spot on. It will vary according to the product and the subscribers you are sending it to. Some people respond to pictures, other like the details. Always check it on a mobile.

    2/ Easy to follow

    Don’t bore your readers. Keep line length on the lower end of reasonable. Have short sentences and short paragraphs. Ignore what you were taught at college.

    There’s nothing wrong with a one sentence paragraph.

    3/ Typefaces

    Many advise no more than three typefaces. Others suggest this is extravagant. Vary fonts instead, using bold and italic. Resize the type, but keep one size for one purpose so readers know what the function is.

    4/ Declutter

    Limit content to the absolute necessities. White space is an essential, so ensure you have plenty of that. Leading in type, i.e. the space between lines of text, is a difficult balance. Look at others’ email marketing designs that look good and copy.

    5/ Colour

    Colour is a subject in itself. For the moment, view your emails on phones and tablets too see what looks right. Ask others, as colour appreciation can be personal.

    6/ Movement

    Not video, but the way a reader’s eyes move from place to place in the email. Make them go step by step so they see what you want them to.

    7/ Readability

    Even if you like Art Deco, you should not base an email marketing campaign design on it unless you know that the subscribers will like it also, and that’s highly unlikely.

    Most importantly, modern design trends, whilst they look modern, are not normally scannable. Fractured text, liquid text, distorted imagery, and other recent trends, are all quite stunning but are all difficult to read for most people. The purpose behind such styles is to impress and not to communicate using words.

    8/ Your target

    Each design should be targeted towards a particular email marketing list, be it by the colours, the degree of white space, the images or anything else mentioned above. In other words, you can modify or ignore any of the previous points if you have a reason to.

    Don’t be dismissive of email marketing templates because they are free. Nor should you take them as perfect just because a professional designer produced them. Treat them as, in fact, templates to be modified to suit your needs.

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  • Always Modify An Email Template Oct 15, 2019

    I don’t like being prescriptive, but it is not a good idea to use an email marketing template ‘straight out of the box’. It will have been designed by a professional, and as you’ve had no graphic art experience, you might not feel the need to prove it by messing it up.

    There’s only so much a professional designer can do without knowing those on your email marketing lists. That’s where you come in. It’s up to you to add those final little twists to the template which will not only make it just right for you, but just right for your subscribers. There are basic traps to avoid though.

    1/ Balance

    You need to ensure you get the relative proportions of text and images spot on. It will vary according to the product and the subscribers you are sending it to. Some people respond to pictures, other like the details. Always check it on a mobile.

    2/ Easy to follow

    Don’t bore your readers. Keep line length on the lower end of reasonable. Have short sentences and short paragraphs. Ignore what you were taught at college.

    There’s nothing wrong with a one sentence paragraph.

    3/ Typefaces

    Many advise no more than three typefaces. Others suggest this is extravagant. Vary fonts instead, using bold and italic. Resize the type, but keep one size for one purpose so readers know what the function is.

    4/ Declutter

    Limit content to the absolute necessities. White space is an essential, so ensure you have plenty of that. Leading in type, i.e. the space between lines of text, is a difficult balance. Look at others’ email marketing designs that look good and copy.

    5/ Colour

    Colour is a subject in itself. For the moment, view your emails on phones and tablets too see what looks right. Ask others, as colour appreciation can be personal.

    6/ Movement

    Not video, but the way a reader’s eyes move from place to place in the email. Make them go step by step so they see what you want them to.

    7/ Readability

    Even if you like Art Deco, you should not base an email marketing campaign design on it unless you know that the subscribers will like it also, and that’s highly unlikely.

    Most importantly, modern design trends, whilst they look modern, are not normally scannable. Fractured text, liquid text, distorted imagery, and other recent trends, are all quite stunning but are all difficult to read for most people. The purpose behind such styles is to impress and not to communicate using words.

    8/ Your target

    Each design should be targeted towards a particular email marketing list, be it by the colours, the degree of white space, the images or anything else mentioned above. In other words, you can modify or ignore any of the previous points if you have a reason to.

    Don’t be dismissive of email marketing templates because they are free. Nor should you take them as perfect just because a professional designer produced them. Treat them as, in fact, templates to be modified to suit your needs.

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  • Simple Ways To Modify An Email Template Oct 15, 2019

    We live in an exciting time for computer graphics. Designers are as willing as ever to experiment and show just how good they are. More remarkably, companies are willing to try their creations. We see explosions of ideas and trends. Some of the designs fill one with wonder.

    You probably think there’s an however coming, and you’re right. The multitude of design trends brings with it problems for those of us who need to target marketing emails and websites. Graphic art can be divisive. Some attract some while repelling others. How can we know which design innovations to follow?

    The answer is both simple and depressing; you should avoid them for anything to do with email marketing.

    I’m not suggesting that you centre all type with images in the middle of pages. Be modern by all means, please do, but ensure designs do what we need them to. I love fluid type, especially the way it can cascade across the screen, but its message is often lost, other than that of being cool.

    Design can, of itself, be a message. Fractured type, with its clever arrangement, is saying ‘I’m modern and cutting edge’, but the words are lost. It is not scannable.

    There are other ways of appearing modern. Colour, for instance, comes in fashion waves, and various shades appeal to different people at different times. You need to keep up with trends.

    This is where you need to use email marketing templates with a degree of inspiration, although thankfully not too much. A template is a base, a foundation on which to build. Most of the structure is there, but it needs dressing.

    The three things to experiment with are typeface, images and, as already mentioned, colour. This might not seem much, but you can change the whole appearance of a marketing email by going from Times to Verdana, or from a vibrant red banner to a cool blue one.

    Your email marketing templates are perfect for changing. Keep the basic layout by all means, but alter it to ensure it will attract your target audience. Nothing is sacred apart from it being scannable. ​

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  • Your First Lead Magnet Campaign Oct 15, 2019

    We need subscribers. It is a certainty in the confusing world of starting out in email marketing. The problem is that generating them is neither easy nor cheap. You can buy-in lists, but many feel this does not normally give value for money. It might be better to find those who want what you are promoting.

    One of the most popular methods, because it works so well, is to use a lead magnet. These are gifts, ostensibly free, where the persons have to identify themselves and give their details, including email addresses; leads in fact. You can ask them to sign up to one of your lists. This can be an enewsletter, email marketing list, or something else; it matters not. We are after getting them on board.

    Despite the various types of lead magnet there are some features common to all of them. After all, regardless of what your offer is, you need to get them to react to you in some way, be it visit your website, your stand at the show, or be tempted by an offer you are promoting. You should:

    1/ Target your campaigns

    Work out who you are after by producing a detailed description of them. Know what they do, what they want and, most importantly, what problems they have.

    2/ Don’t limit yourself

    It can be all too easy to be over-precise in your targeting. Cast your net fairly widely in order to attract those who are a little different from your assumptions. It is easy enough to eliminate later those who are there by mistake or along for the ride.

    3/ Target your gift

    If you know whom you are after, you can offer something that will attract them whilst leaving those whom you don’t want unmoved. Offer solutions to their problems.

    4/ Use multiple platforms

    If someone is looking for the best epicyclic trunnion for the price, then you can produce a blog which shows the advantages of the one you stock. A YouTube video showing one being fitted will attract hits. Facebook offers lots of opportunities for attracting just the ones you want.

    5/ Don’t be stingy

    You’ve had to work for what you’ve got, so it might be difficult for you to throw money away to people who aren’t even your customers. To lower your blood pressure, work out the cost of each subscriber to your email marketing list. That’s money you are spending without generating any sense of gratitude.

    6/ Just a click on an icon to spread the word

    Make it easy for a person to share the link. Giving presents, even when it cost the person nothing, is a way of making them feel good about themselves. Have prominent sharing buttons.

    7/ Be clear what they are signing up for

    Don’t give anything away without, at least, an email address. Be clear as to what they are signing up for. Have sign-ups for an email marketing list on the landing page.

    8/ Ensure they are grateful

    Point out just how great your offer is.

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  • Should You Give Away Valuable Items? Oct 15, 2019

    You have worked hard for everything you’ve got, so why should you give away something just to gain subscribers to your email marketing list? The answer is that it is probably the cheapest way of getting them.

    Work out how much it costs to gain subscribers in other ways. There’s the cost of a stand at a trade fair, and don’t forget the costs of travel and personnel. Oh, and hotels, food and – well, you see the point. It’s extra costs all the time.

    Ignore the free bit of free gifts when trying for a lead magnet. There is a charge that they pay when subscribing to your email marketing lists. Entrusting you with their email address might not seem much to them, but to you it is a way to increase your RoI.

    However, and it is a big consideration, you must give them something that they will value. Everyone has worries. For instance, ‘Your Brexit Concerns Solved’. We’d all go for that.

    Be specific to your products. If you sell holidays, how about a checklist that varies depending on where they are going. Such a checklist is a chance for you to display your professionalism. If you are B2B or after seasoned travellers, then demonstrate lots of the intricacies. Similarly, for newcomers, explain it simply. You can have regular updates to keep them coming back for more.

    Whatever you choose, ensure it publicises your company and its products. If the lead magnet is an explanation of healthy exercise for the middle-aged then images of people demonstrating them in your sparsely populated gym, with your banner prominent, will keep your name in their minds.

    Your content should be sufficient to justify the title, but brief enough to make them want more. Include hotlinks to your website, where there will be calls to action to sign up for your email marketing list. Mention your enewsletter, so easy to sign up for, has regular updates.

    Subscribers cost; it’s a fact of email marketing. A gift is just another way of paying that cost, and if used with care, it can be one of the cheapest methods.

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  • A Year Into The GPDR. How Was It For You? Oct 15, 2019

    It was suggested that the General Data Protection Regulations spelt the death of email marketing, or at least that we would have to modify our processes to an extent that would hit our return on investment. Now, after more than a year, it has shown itself to have been easy enough to cope with. I’m not normally one to say that I told you so, but I told you so.

    The phrase ‘customer centric’ was bandied around well before we knew the details, let alone before the go-live date, and there were fears that our subscribers would make unreasonable demands that would cost us a considerable amount to comply with. That did not materialise.

    It is fair to say that there were a number of aspects that were a little obscure, but the fact the regulations were not prescriptive dovetailed neatly with the ICO’s policy of pointing out errors rather than prosecuting immediately. I’ve asked them a couple of times for clarification and the answers, not always definitive, have been prompt. Try them yourself.

    We have data on our email marketing lists to protect and I would assume that most of us have developed procedures, hopefully more than just tick box, to ensure easy and reassuring compliance. In addition, the ICO has been discrete in its enforcement, mainly preferring the option of encouragement, albeit with an implied threat.

    It is unfortunate that a number of big names in digital commerce, including email marketing, have not shown themselves willing to comply with the letter of the law. There have been some epic breaches of the regulations that have got into the press and we are all damned by the actions of those who should have known better. And probably did.

    One aspect of the lack of prescription is that it is left to individual companies to interpret how the legislation affects their particular company and procedures. The phrase ‘spirit of the law’ is one that is overused, and ‘ethical behaviour’ might be more appropriate.

    There seems little doubt that consumers are becoming more aware of online trickery and this can be seen in the reluctance to subscribe to email marketing lists. The way to distance your company from those whose intent is to deceive is to be open and honest. For instance, default settings designed to trick a customer into divulging more information than they wished to or to confuse them into subscribing to an email marketing list, will come back to bite those who indulge in such practices.

    Be open and transparent. Give explanations by way of a ‘what’s this’ click through to further information. Say precisely what you are going to do with their data. Make the contact details of your DPO obvious. Send an email after they have given you their information telling them exactly what they have shared and provide an opportunity for them to rescind permissions.

    It is probable that by such means you will lose a few leads. However, the ones that stay will have a degree of trust that will increase your ROI.​


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  • Ethical Behaviour In Email Marketing Oct 15, 2019

    One way the police put at ease suspects and witnesses they are interviewing is to be open and transparent with regards to the reasons for the questions. Another rule is never to lie to the interviewee or their legal representative. It’s all about trust. There is a distinct parallel with email marketing.

    It is probable that many people might be more than a little wary when asked to share their personal data with you. It’s not an unreasonable position to take considering the cavalier way in which many multinationals treat data. To get them to subscribe to your email marketing list requires overt action; a campaign in fact.

    Continuing with the analogy of police interview techniques, one of the first questions put to a witness or suspect is, ‘Have you any questions?’ If the interviewee is unsure of procedures, they will be worrying about what will happen rather than how they can help. You should do the same.

    To be rather harsh, ethical behaviour is all about the bottom line. It is a profitable stand to take. If a subscriber is deceived, once they realise, they will be inclined to click the unsubscribe button. Whilst you may lose an occasional lead by being overt, once you’ve got them on your lists, they are unlikely to leave through distrust of you. Further, they will know exactly what is happening with their data.

    Be clear about what subscribing to an email marketing list means. Have it on a click-through. Entitle it, ‘What we will do with your data’, or maybe ‘. . . information you entrust us with’.

    ‘Why do we need this information’ is another explanation that might break down barriers against trust. A picture of your DRO or telephone receptionist can work wonders, making your security processes more personalised. Provide them with the ability to gain all the information about what you do with your email marketing data.

    Trust, the one thing that can be depended on to boost and maintain your ROI, is easy enough to build up. All you have to do is be honest with your subscribers from the start.
  • Brexit – Government help and advice Oct 15, 2019

    At the time of writing, there was no clear cut decision as to the nature of Brexit, whether it would go ahead on 31 October, or at all. Whatever your thoughts on the matter, and how it will affect email marketing, now is not the time to wait for clarification. The Government has, on https://www.gov.uk/brexit#business, listed all you need to, as it says, ‘Get ready for Brexit’.

    It’s exhaustive, although there’s always the chance that something has been missed. In other words, as the move towards Brexit progresses, other circumstance might be revealed that will require some inspired action on your behalf.

    The campaign has two main thrusts: what the individual should consider and, which will be dealt with here, how to ensure your business, be it email marketing or something else, is ready for Brexit. For businesses and organisation, there is a list of further click throughs for those who:

    Export goods to the EU
    Import goods from the EU
    Transport goods by road
    Export animals or animal products

    Click on export and you will get a six stage list of what you should do.

    Stage 1 is all about Economic Operator Registration and Identification (EORI) numbers. There’s a further click through on how to obtain an EORI number. A sub-heading in Stage 1 is on checking if your importer has a EORI number.

    Stage 2 is the process of export declarations, with click throughs to an explanation of how to hire someone to do it for you, or the DIY option. The Common Transit Convention is explained and whether you will be able to use it.

    Stage 3 is refreshingly brief, and is about tax and duty for exported goods.

    Stage 4 explains further obligations placed on you depending on what type of goods you are exporting, and whether you need to apply for an export licence. There is a click through for alcohol, tobacco and certain oils, and another for controlled goods like firearms.

    Stage 5 is on VAT changes.

    Stage 6 is regarding transporting goods outside the EU. Again, the options as to hiring someone to do it for you or doing it yourself are explained.

    It might seem daunting to anyone who has not considered post Brexit changes before, but the Government advice is, if anything, reassuring. For instance, you might not have heard of an EORI number, nor the requirement for it, but the process is quite straightforward.

    You can apply for a number on the EORI page. See https://www.gov.uk/eori?step-by-step-nav=e169b2ac-8c90-4789-8e6c-3657729e21b2. It explains what you may need before you apply. You can get an EORI number right away in most cases or, if HMRC needs to make further checks, within five working days.

    The intent of the advice appears to be to simplify the processes of export and import and, to a greater extent than many might have anticipated, it does it well. From the point of view of those of us engaged in email marketing, especially, but not exclusively, to the EU, it provides an easily understood procedure for getting everything right and, hopefully, profitable.
  • An Interesting Period For Email Marketing Oct 11, 2019

    I have a fascination with history, especially the social and political sides; a bit of a contrast with email marketing. So you’d think I’d be thrilled to be, like you, in the middle of a political crisis. It’s the reverse in fact. I’m worried for the outcome.

    There will be professors who specialise in Brexit receiving contracts at prestigious universities in years to come, and one aspect they might well concentrate on is the current constitutional melee. They’ll be able to point out where they would have made different decisions, but the historical precedents all go to show mistakes will happen.

    What can we do to protect our interests?

    Some in government circles are keeping their heads, and have collated advice on what you can do as an individual and as an organisation to mitigate, and hopefully profit from, the current doubt around Brexit. It is an instructional read, written in easily accessible language, and arranged in a way that makes it straightforward to identify and then follow the various procedures which are specific to you. See https://www.gov.uk/brexit

    One point that will probably come as a relief is that it is reassuring in its message. It is a direct counter to any feeling of panic you might be experiencing. More to the point, this trepidation might be common among your customers, particularly those on your email marketing list.

    Nervousness as to the outcome of Brexit affects business and, with it, RoI, can be seen in the business news. You and your company might well benefit from reassuring your clientele. Post links to the Gov.uk site, and include a précis on yours. Mention it in your next email marketing campaign.

    Show your subscribers that you have confidence that you will continue much as before whatever the outcome. Explain the processes you have installed. Be confident, clear and show that you’ve got it covered.

    When all the histories of the present period have been published and argued over, it is probable that most people will think it was all a fuss over very little. That’s the norm. However, a little preparation can go a long way to mitigating risk.

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  • DPIA And Its Impact On Email Marketing Oct 11, 2019

    Data protection regulations can be seen as the bane of anyone who collects or maintains personal data. We, with our dependence on email marketing lists, have to make a considerable investment with regards to research and training staff, so being told by the ICO that we might need to make a Data Protection Impact Assessment (DPIA) might be met with a certain resignation.

    In case you don’t know what a DPIA is, you must/should complete one if the processing or personal data is likely to result in high risk. It should not be looked on as an imposition so much as a safety procedure that can protect you, your company and staff, in dangerous circumstances. In fact, it should be considered in any major process that includes personal data.

    The advertised function of a DPIA is, according to the ICO, to ‘help you identify and minimise the data protection risks of a project.’ Whilst you should not quote me on this, previous actions by the ICO tend to indicate that if there is a problem and the ICO investigates, the fact that a DPIA was completed properly will go some way to mitigate any penalty.

    Suggesting that you ‘did your best’ is not enough on its own. A certain level of competence is required when handling personal data. As we maintain email marketing lists on a daily basis, processes should be as secure as possible.

    The ICO states that if a DPIA is required, see later, it must:

    1/ describe the nature, scope, context and purposes of the processing;
    2/ assess necessity, proportionality and compliance measures;
    3/ identify and assess risks to individuals; and
    4/ identify any additional measures to mitigate those risks.


    Number 3/ is the difficult bit of course, as it requires judgement. The ICO gives advice on what to consider, such as the likelihood and severity of the impact on individuals. You should document the reasons you came to your conclusions.

    You should consult your data protection officer and, if necessary, other specialists. If you identify a high level of risk to individuals but can mitigate it with additional procedures, then the risk level drops. If you can’t then you must consult the ICO before starting.

    The ICO assumes that it would not be the norm for them to be sent DPIAs. It promises to give written advice within eight weeks, but, in complex cases, this extends to 14. They may then issue a formal warning not to process the data or to stop processing altogether.

    Why should you bother? There are always risks with building, maintaining and processing email marketing lists, and you will have processes in place to ensure that these risks are kept to a minimum. Nice as it would be to suggest that they can be eliminated, it can’t be done with any process that requires input from individuals.

    Instigating a DPIA, either because it is required or you feel it appropriate, is a way of ensuring your data is safe. That’s a decent target for anyone in email marketing.

  • Everyone should make friends with the ICO Oct 11, 2019

    The ICO (the Information Commissioner’s Office) polices data protection and, with our, hopefully massive, email marketing lists, you’d think we should be wary of them but it’s just the reverse. We should look upon them as a valuable asset.

    It is almost as if the ICO doesn’t want a lot of bother. It’s the easy life for them, and if they don’t have to indulge in expensive litigation, the happier they will be. Their intent seems to be to make it easier for us not to fall foul of the regulations.

    Take the Data Protection Impact Assessment (DPIA). They describe it as a process to help us identify and minimise the data protection risks of a project. The process consists of a series of checks, tick boxes if you like. The first step is to identify if your next project is likely to result in a high risk to individuals.

    You will want to protect the integrity of your email marketing lists, but there’s always a risk attached to any processing. Our job is to minimise that risk, not only from a legal point of view, but a moral and practical one as well. We’ve been entrusted with personal data. We should look after it.

    You might wonder what constitutes a high risk. To your aid comes the ICO, which provides a checklist. If there is a high risk, then there are processes which you must follow. If these do not lower the risk to an acceptable level, the ICO must be advised. It does not end there though.

    Your particular project, perhaps a vital email marketing campaign that is integrated with other forms of advertising, might fall on the right side of risky. However, it might be useful and reassuring to run your project through the whole DPIA process. It might well indicate ways in which you can improve your security processes.

    It could also be a useful defence if the worse comes to the worst and the ICO becomes interested.

    The ICO website has much to offer anyone trusted with personal data in email marketing lists. Bother them and they probably won’t bother you later.

    See: https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-to-data-protection/guide-to-the-general-data-protection-regulation-gdpr/accountability-and-governance/data-protection-impact-assessments/

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  • The 7 points to consider in landing page design Oct 10, 2019

    There are any number of things to consider when designing a landing page. This is email marketing, so there will be lots of options, but here is my top seven. You might disagree, but it might get you thinking.

    1/ One size does not fit all

    You will be working with segmented email marketing lists. Each group will differ in some way. Work out the salient differences and focus the design of their email with them in mind. If you can’t work out what makes each group distinct, then you need to work on your segmenting skills. Picture them, with their phone in their hand, reading the email. Ask yourself what they are looking for. What is going to make their, and your, day?

    2/ Impactive

    Hit them with a dramatic headline. Grab their attention from the off. Work out what is the prime message and feature it prominently. If you’re proud of your product, then show it. Repeat it a couple of times. Go for their emotions from the start, as th at is what will sell. Convince them that this is just the thing they need for their company or holiday.

    3/ Out with clutter

    I like minimalist. There are no distractions and the response to the email is controlled. I’m all for reducing copy. However, if you prefer to look a bit different, then go ahead, but remember that the opposite of minimalist is not disorganised. If you add images and colour, have a reason for doing so. If you leave them out, also have a reason for doing so.

    4/ Direct

    Tell your subscribers what to do. While email marketing can be subtle, you haven’t got long. Have arrows. Highlight the click throughs. Tell them the advantages of your offer. You want them to be as enthusiastic about it as you are.

    5/ Convert

    While we’re on targeting, always remember that the purpose of any marketing email is to convert. If you fail in that aspect, then you’ve failed entirely. Every image must be aimed at conversions. The same goes for every word of copy. If it is doing nothing, get rid of it. If it just filling space, then it is an obstruction to the functions of the landing page, which is to convert.

    6/ Reassure

    All subscribers require reassurance and this will vary from one specific email marketing list to another. A new subscriber, particularly if it is their first campaign, might require a high level of reassurance. You might consider including a précis of a testimonial or two, or a couple of reviews, all hotlinked to the full originals. Have a prominent logo and your corporate message. If it is to a regular customer, who has bought from you before, then be familiar. In both cases, replicate the design of the marketing email in some way.

    7/ Vary your emails

    Test and test again is the email marketing mantra. Give everything a go. If you think a video might help conversions, then try one. You’ve got little to lose and everything to gain.

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  • Landing Pages Design And Content Oct 10, 2019

    There are many factors to consider when it comes to creating landing pages to back up an email marketing campaign. Much will depend on, for instance, how the person arrives at the page, and each route will require different design factors.

    For instance, if they came via an online ad, you’ll know little about them. If they came from a click through on an enewsletter, then you’d be aware of their interests, and they’ll be familiar with your company. If they came via a marketing email, you’ll be able to exploit the information you have on them and be specific for each segmented email marketing list.

    At the start of the design process, you’ll need to consider the purpose of the landing page. While you want a person to complete, what you are offering will limit the design in many ways.

    If you are giving something away, a classic method of gaining subscribers to your email marketing list, then you should concentrate on the product. If it’s an ebook on, for instance, the delights of Venice, you will excite them with the copy and title. Who could resist ‘The Wonders of Unknown Venice, and How to Find Them’? If they enjoy the book, they might well complete on the minibreak.

    Getting them to subscribe to an enewsletter needs an explanation of what they’ll get. An image, or even a short video, of an example, can be included. Don’t offer them a click through to your latest publication. It will deflect them from signing up.

    In the case of an ebook and newsletter, you should have a form that’s limited in what it asks. Too many questions will put off many. Just a name and email address can be enough.

    Subscribing to your email marketing list needs a more persuasive approach. You want them to trust you with their information, so include a testimonial or two. Appear confident yet approachable. Mention security and reputation. If you’ve been in email marketing for five years, then say so. The form will be longer, but also as short as possible. Reassure them with every word and image.

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  • No One Got Rich By Giving Things Away Oct 10, 2019

    You can’t argue against it. It’s obvious that selling products at a loss does nothing for your ROI, at least not directly. Yet email marketing companies do it. Not only that, the most successful seem to do it more than the others. Therefore, they must have their reasons.

    For research purposes I subscribed to a company pushing weekends away in rather up-market hotels. We all like a bit of luxury, but few of us like paying an extra percentage to allow such places to pamper us. The difference in cost between four and five star hotels is often significant, and I’ll only use the swimming pool for a couple of hours.

    The first email offered a quality hotel at the price of a four star one. After a quick check with the calendar, I’d booked a three-night stay. They must have made little profit from it.

    Each new subscriber to your email marketing lists costs you. In fact, you should know precisely how much for each one. The problem with someone new to your lists is that you know very little about them. Data is what we need to be successful, not only in sales, but to keep subscribers. The more we know, the more we can predict.

    The first thing you want your subscriber to do is provide you with data that you can work with. When they sign up you might well get the basic demographics, such as gender and location, but that gives you little to work on. We need to segment our email marketing lists, and for that to be effective we need precise information.

    You could ask, of course, but if you’re looking for something to scare potential subscribers, a long form will do it every time. A much subtler way is to make them give you data by their actions. Make them choose.

    The first marketing email from the holiday company I subscribed to started with an effusive welcome, promises of lots of offers, and some bumf about them visiting every hotel on their lists. It was disappointingly bland. Then came the offer, or offers rather.

    There was a selection of six hotels in various parts of the country. I clicked through to three in all, showing my preferences. Each hotel offered various times and standards of room. I clicked on the prices for ‘outside of school holidays’, again giving data to the company. And so it went on.

    The prices were remarkable, so I wasn’t going to rush. My selection, and my tortuous route, would give indicators as to which group I should be placed the next time the company segmented its email marketing list.

    The requirement for an email marketer is to choose offers that will indicate preferences, via click throughs as well as choices. Ensure there’s a range to pick from, and the data you receive will be what will help you make your choices.

    The weekend was rather pleasant. The service and facilities as described. Despite me joining the list for research, I’m staying for other reasons.

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