Zero Hours Holiday Pay

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Walker13

Free Member
Aug 21, 2019
9
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Hi all,

Could someone help me with a couple of queries on Holiday pay for zero hour contract’s please?

Firstly, 20 days per year plus 8 bank holidays, is this correct?

Secondly, how do you work out the hours of holiday they are entitled to please? Isn’t it calculate 12 weeks worth of work back and work out a weekly average?

How much hours are they entitled to instead of days over the year? Hard to work out days when a normal day can be between 4-8 hours

Getting a little confused by it all!

Thanks
 

Newchodge

Business Member
Nov 8, 2012
16,232
4,585
Newcastle
Hi all,

Could someone help me with a couple of queries on Holiday pay for zero hour contract’s please?

Firstly, 20 days per year plus 8 bank holidays, is this correct?
No

Secondly, how do you work out the hours of holiday they are entitled to please? Isn’t it calculate 12 weeks worth of work back and work out a weekly average?No

How much hours are they entitled to instead of days over the year? Hard to work out days when a normal day can be between 4-8 hours

Getting a little confused by it all!

Thanks
 
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Newchodge

Business Member
Nov 8, 2012
16,232
4,585
Newcastle
Are you genuinely operating a zero hours contract, where your staff do not know from week to week how many, or if any, hours they will work?

If so you calcualte their holiday entitlement by multiplying the hours worked by 12.07%. That gives the number of hours holiday due. You pay at the normal hourly rate.

If staff work a standard minimum number of hours every week, then you are not operating zero hours contracts and different rules apply.

I do not understand how you can operate zero hours contracts without this already being in the contract.
 
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Walker13

Free Member
Aug 21, 2019
9
0
Are you genuinely operating a zero hours contract, where your staff do not know from week to week how many, or if any, hours they will work?

If so you calcualte their holiday entitlement by multiplying the hours worked by 12.07%. That gives the number of hours holiday due. You pay at the normal hourly rate.

If staff work a standard minimum number of hours every week, then you are not operating zero hours contracts and different rules apply.

I do not understand how you can operate zero hours contracts without this already being in the contract.

Yes, indeed I am, the hours fluctuate and no precise hours
 
Last edited:
Upvote 0

Walker13

Free Member
Aug 21, 2019
9
0
Are you genuinely operating a zero hours contract, where your staff do not know from week to week how many, or if any, hours they will work?

If so you calcualte their holiday entitlement by multiplying the hours worked by 12.07%. That gives the number of hours holiday due. You pay at the normal hourly rate.

If staff work a standard minimum number of hours every week, then you are not operating zero hours contracts and different rules apply.

I do not understand how you can operate zero hours contracts without this already being in the contract.

Thanks that’s perfect, and what if they’ve been on sick for a week? (Statutory sick pay) I’m sure they are still entitled to some holiday pay for that? Would you multiply 12.07% by the amount of statutory sick pay and pay that as an amount other than hourly?
 
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Newchodge

Business Member
Nov 8, 2012
16,232
4,585
Newcastle
Thanks that’s perfect, and what if they’ve been on sick for a week? (Statutory sick pay) I’m sure they are still entitled to some holiday pay for that? Would you multiply 12.07% by the amount of statutory sick pay and pay that as an amount other than hourly?
They accrue holiday while sick. If you paid SSP you must have known when they were due to be working, those are the hours for which they accrue holiday.
 
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The easiest way to calculate holiday entitlement is as it accrues, meaning your staff earn holidays based on the number of hours they work.

The statutory holiday entitlement of 5.6 weeks is equal to 12.07% of the total hours worked in a year.

To calculate a zero-hours worker’s holiday entitlement, multiply 12.07% by the number of hours they’ve worked. For example:

An employee on a zero-hours contract who works 10 hours in a week would get 72.6 minutes of holiday pay. Here’s how you work that out:

12.07 ÷ 100 x 10 = 1.21 hours

The result is 1.21 hours, which is equal to 72.6 minutes. That means you owe your employee around 1 hour and 12 minutes of holiday leave.

FYI - Stole this from BrightHR.
 
Upvote 0

Newchodge

Business Member
Nov 8, 2012
16,232
4,585
Newcastle
The easiest way to calculate holiday entitlement is as it accrues, meaning your staff earn holidays based on the number of hours they work.

The statutory holiday entitlement of 5.6 weeks is equal to 12.07% of the total hours worked in a year.

To calculate a zero-hours worker’s holiday entitlement, multiply 12.07% by the number of hours they’ve worked. For example:

An employee on a zero-hours contract who works 10 hours in a week would get 72.6 minutes of holiday pay. Here’s how you work that out:

12.07 ÷ 100 x 10 = 1.21 hours

The result is 1.21 hours, which is equal to 72.6 minutes. That means you owe your employee around 1 hour and 12 minutes of holiday leave.

FYI - Stole this from BrightHR.

I just posted it from my own knowledge.
 
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