WiFi Boosters

Discussion in 'IT & Internet' started by DishonestDave, May 11, 2017.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. DishonestDave

    DishonestDave UKBF Contributor Free Member

    78 26
    I am looking for something that will give me a minimum of 300m of extra WiFi range, but up to 4000m would be better.

    I've spent about the last 2-3 hours researching devices, but am little wiser as to what I may need. In particular as much of what is for sale is Chinese junk with obviously wildly exaggerated properties.

    Some details:

    The wifi signals I want to pick up are within a 45 degree path
    Outdoor would be better as the house is quite sheltered

    One of the few branded ones I've seen that claims a large range is:

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/TP-LINK-C...636831?hash=item19f495bedf:g:qKAAAOSwKtlWp-9j

    But I am not sure whether this is a booster or something else.

    For long range the best solution seems to be an antenna, which are advertised at having ranges up to at least 56km. But I don't know what the specifics of using them are and this is to take to Serbia, so would be better if it was not bulky.
     
    Posted: May 11, 2017 By: DishonestDave Member since: Jun 24, 2016
    #1
  2. Alan

    Alan UKBF Legend Full Member - Verified Business

    6,570 1,814
    300m - 4000m is one of those a typo or do you really have such wide expectations

    p.s what is not clear from your post is are you planning to pick up an existing signal or are you transmitting the signal (or both)?
     
    Posted: May 11, 2017 By: Alan Member since: Aug 16, 2011
    #2
  3. DishonestDave

    DishonestDave UKBF Contributor Free Member

    78 26
    When I was I Greece I stayed at a place where they were using a cheap Chinese booster to pick up a signal 200m away. It had all kind of networks available by it that I could not get on my laptop and it was in a rural area so I presume it was picking up 500-1000m. I saw references to a Powerlink one (no longer available in the UK) which was advertised as 2000m and had a review saying that was a legit claim.

    I know someone know who lives in a village in South Serbia, who has anantennawhich points at a beacon on a TV station tower 4.5km away for their internet. Most people in villages get their internet like this there. But as I will only be there a few weeks a year I don't want to pay £100 / year for internet.

    I am looking to pick up an existing signal, not transmit.
     
    Posted: May 11, 2017 By: DishonestDave Member since: Jun 24, 2016
    #3
  4. Alan

    Alan UKBF Legend Full Member - Verified Business

    6,570 1,814
    I must admit totally confused.

    So you could point an antenna at a tower 4.5km away but that costs you £100 a year - so you don't want to do that? So where are you going to get a signal from?
     
    Posted: May 11, 2017 By: Alan Member since: Aug 16, 2011
    #4
  5. paulears

    paulears UKBF Big Shot Full Member

    4,373 1,130
    Er, wi-fi is bi-directional if you intend to use it to connect to the net, so of code you are going to transmit, unless you are looking at non-internet wi-fi such as audio links or video links that use the 2.4GHz frequencies.
     
    Posted: May 11, 2017 By: paulears Member since: Jan 7, 2015
    #5
  6. Alan

    Alan UKBF Legend Full Member - Verified Business

    6,570 1,814
    We know what we mean :) Is he going to be creating an access point or is he going to be an end user device. ( end user device )
     
    Posted: May 11, 2017 By: Alan Member since: Aug 16, 2011
    #6
  7. DishonestDave

    DishonestDave UKBF Contributor Free Member

    78 26
    £100 is the cheap one for low speeds and caps. If I want a good connection I would be paying £300+ / year for one month of internet, mainly just for emails and a light bit of work.

    These boosters and antennas work (I believe) by sending out their own signal. In towns and villages there is typically a beacon that sends out a signal 360 degrees. If you're miles away from this you can't locate that signal with a network card, you need one of the antennas to send out a signal that reaches the beacon's signal.

    Serbia is awash with open networks. You can typically walk from one end of a settlement to another and have some open network to connect to. I want to connect to these.
     
    Posted: May 11, 2017 By: DishonestDave Member since: Jun 24, 2016
    #7
  8. ffox

    ffox UKBF Regular Free Member

    1,306 237
    Check out the 3g/4g coverage in the area where you will be. I believe you can get PAYG 7 day Data SIMS for a reasonable cost.
     
    Posted: May 11, 2017 By: ffox Member since: Mar 11, 2004
    #8
  9. paulears

    paulears UKBF Big Shot Full Member

    4,373 1,130
    You need to get a handle omg the terminology. Beacons are one way devices that essentially just say "I am here". Antennas are either omni-directional and are effective through 360 degrees, or they are directional with a range of beam widths. The key feature of antennas is gain. If you have a beam with say 10dB of gain pointed at an omnidirectional antenna, then your distance is a little greater than a 6dB beam - however there is no direct correlation between power, distance and gain. Indeed, it's often thought that you need lots of Watts - but the power output the other end is just as important - pointless squirting lots of energy to the distant site if you cannot hear what comes back! If you see a thin (25mm or so) vertical tube, often white or grey, less than 400mm long or so, this is an omni-directional type - radiating all around. Sausage, or sail shape antennas are directional, but there are also square types, reminiscent of the old BSB Squarial, if you are old enough to remember them, and these are also directional. Many schools use wi-fi with outside antennas in my area, and I note one of their IT technicians has a square antenna on his house about 2 miles away, aimed at the school - no doubt to take advantage of the school hi-speed system. A small town near me has terrible internet service, and a small business has installed a system with an omni aerial on the church tower, it then has a link to a site a couple of miles away that has a decent access into the network. People subscribe and point a small antenna at the church. It works fine.

    If there are open systems in Serbia locally, then if you can find a decent speed 24/7 one then there will absolutely be an antenna that will do the trick - BUT - distance can be expensive. These are not domestic products and a commercial higher gain 2.4GHz directional antenna can cost quite a bit, and need specific cabling too. Cheaper domestic products are not that expensive - but cable can easily be £2 a metre, plus connectors at maybe a fiver each!
     
    Posted: May 11, 2017 By: paulears Member since: Jan 7, 2015
    #9
  10. KM-Tiger

    KM-Tiger UKBF Legend Full Member - Verified Business

    9,991 2,670
    I think it's an antenna the OP needs.

    No expert on this but I have a friend with a boat with an antenna on the mast. He tells me that in most ports he can find and connect to an open wifi network.
     
    Posted: May 12, 2017 By: KM-Tiger Member since: Aug 10, 2003
    #10
  11. paulears

    paulears UKBF Big Shot Full Member

    4,373 1,130
    Try WiFi Map Free app - very useful to show you where many access points are that you could use.
     
    Posted: May 12, 2017 By: paulears Member since: Jan 7, 2015
    #11
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.