Why overtaxing the rich is wrong

Discussion in 'General Business Forum' started by Cornish Steve, Apr 21, 2011.

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  1. Podge

    Podge UKBF Newcomer Free Member

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    Well the 100 or so that turned up for the interview I attended yesterday all appeared to be keen to find work and not just fulfilling an obligation. They were all smartly attired and actively took part in all the activities. There might have been about 10% that baulked at doing "the Apprentice" style challenge and didn't come back. Also a few people had traveled from as far away as London and leeds to attend the interview.
    So while not dicounting your experiences they are vastly different to what I witnessed.
     
    Posted: Apr 28, 2011 By: Podge Member since: Jan 13, 2011
  2. JohnLocke1

    JohnLocke1 UKBF Newcomer Free Member

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    Admittedly it was three years ago I last interviewed people, and we are in an area of very low employment. I'll correct that as I've just checked, now unemployment in our area is about 7.8% so about average so there is a good chance my experience is no longer valid!

    Trouble is I can't now afford to take on any staff :(
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2011
    Posted: Apr 28, 2011 By: JohnLocke1 Member since: Apr 12, 2011
  3. papverpoppies

    papverpoppies UKBF Newcomer Free Member

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    I do not think they just have to 'apply' for a job, they have to also 'cold call'' which is ok up to a point, but it is going to get to the stage where some companies will get hacked off with answering the phone, or physically telling people they have NO vacancies.

    Plus the 39% of jobs that never get advertised usually go via word of mouth from within the company, friends or family (always exceptions to the rule) but not enough to make a dent on the 2.7 million unemployed figures.


    There are scroungers who abuse the system, but its sad to read on here the negative attitude some people have towards those who are out of work; along with the 'I could get a job ' view, it is always easier to have that outlook when you are sitting running your own company.

    I bet some of the people looking for work, once thought that, as well as maybe owning their own business once! You might write you would stack shelf's for minimum wage, but would you really; if you had been your own boss? Easy to say yes, when not in that situation.

    Pops xx
     
    Posted: Apr 28, 2011 By: papverpoppies Member since: Apr 8, 2009
  4. bdw

    bdw Banned

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    Two excellent points Pops.

    .
     
    Posted: Apr 28, 2011 By: bdw Member since: Aug 13, 2008
  5. papverpoppies

    papverpoppies UKBF Newcomer Free Member

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    Into days economic climate, I bet there are a lot of ex business owners signing on!

    I have been very saddened by some of the comments posted on here, almost treating unemployed people like lepers; along with the 'you are doing it all wrong attitude; this is what you should be doing to find work, see how easy it is'!

    I have a good friend who lost his job several weeks ago, he was a teacher and had been for 20+ years.

    He does all of what has been suggested on here, and more, the reality is, he is one of countless doing likewise!

    I have watched this lovely man (and his wife) suffer through the stigma of being unemployed - through no fault of his own (surplus to requirement and cuts backs can happen to anyone).

    When you lose your job (or your own business) all that you had before counts as nothing - you become just one of the many looking for work.

    Whatever happened to compassion and understanding; it seems to be sadly lacking in some quarters into days World.

    Pops xx
     
    Posted: Apr 28, 2011 By: papverpoppies Member since: Apr 8, 2009
  6. Guest

    0 0
    well said that lady,i know family members who have been in work for 25 years for lots of firms, who have now been jobless for over a year no matter how hard they try to find any kind of work.
    self employment and running a business not for every one and lets be honest staring up can leave you very skint for a few years.
     
    Posted: Apr 28, 2011 By: Member since: Jan 1, 1970
  7. TheEngineer

    TheEngineer UKBF Contributor Free Member

    96 20
    Looks like I picked a hot topic for my first post!

    The other thing to remember is that if you are a business owner that employs staff then you want a proportion of your staff to be "plodders" who come in an do a good job without being too ambitious. Otherwise they will be off within a year or two when someone else offers them a bit more money or a promotion.

    As with all areas of life we need a balance of people with different skills.

    One of the problems is that in a boom "anyone" who wants to work will find work. In a bust employers can be more picky and so those with the lowest skills or who worked in areas which suffer the most in a recession will struggle to find work. I know many in the building trade who worked incredibly hard a couple of years ago and are now finding very few jobs.
     
    Posted: Apr 28, 2011 By: TheEngineer Member since: Apr 28, 2011
  8. JohnnyCash

    JohnnyCash Guest

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    I was speaking to a family member about this, he works in the building trade doing plastering, being a bricky, manual labour etc. He was going on and on about there not being any jobs available.

    Once we got into it a bit it became obvious there was actually plenty of work available... he was just didn't want to do it for what was the current market rates (which have been completely destroyed with Poles working for rock bottom prices).
     
    Posted: Apr 28, 2011 By: JohnnyCash Member since: Dec 8, 2010
  9. RedEvo

    RedEvo UKBF Legend Free Member

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    The posts in here seem to suggest not a lack of job opportunities, but the age old problem of the skills gap.

    d
     
    Posted: Apr 28, 2011 By: RedEvo Member since: May 12, 2007
  10. papverpoppies

    papverpoppies UKBF Newcomer Free Member

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    Exactly, unless you have money put aside, or some means of income, then setting up on your own is not really an option, plus if you have always worked for someone is can be pretty scary at 50+ thinking of going it alone, also not everyone is capable of running their own business.

    It is also a fact that the older you get, the more difficult it is to find a well paid job. They may not be able to legally ask for your age any more on an application form, but it is not that hard to work out, when asking for education dates.

    Yes, it might put bread and butter on the table, but collecting the trolleys at your local supermarket (and being treated like a brainless wonder) when once you had authority for a large companies finances, ran your own business, or had taught thousands of kids over the years - is not exactly the end some had envisaged to their working days.

    So, I think we can excuse those who do not do cartwheels as they rush to Tescos, BQ and the likes.

    Pops xx
     
    Posted: Apr 28, 2011 By: papverpoppies Member since: Apr 8, 2009
  11. papverpoppies

    papverpoppies UKBF Newcomer Free Member

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    There is a lack of jobs for the older worker (well paid jobs) the worker who at 50+ still needs to bring in a good wage.

    Pops xx
     
    Posted: Apr 28, 2011 By: papverpoppies Member since: Apr 8, 2009
  12. sirearl

    sirearl UKBF Legend Free Member

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    Not a lot of skill required for most of the jobs available in the UK.:eek:

    Earl
     
    Posted: Apr 28, 2011 By: sirearl Member since: Apr 23, 2007
  13. TheEngineer

    TheEngineer UKBF Contributor Free Member

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    True - to a degree.

    I recently employed someone 50+ with a good technical background (different field to mine and not really relevant) and gave them 6 months to prove themselves. They are now earning well above the average UK wage and very happy with the new role they have (or so they tell me!).
     
    Posted: Apr 28, 2011 By: TheEngineer Member since: Apr 28, 2011
  14. Matt1959

    Matt1959 UKBF Legend Free Member

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    well if theres one thread here that makes me determined not to allow my kids be wage slaves, its this one! And, as for the comments on here regarding the unemployed, I dont see them as negative - far from it. Is anyone looking for work going to be inspired by someone telling them its more possible if you go about it in a certain way or are they going to be inspired by someone telling them how terrible, hard and impossible everything is - I know who I'd rather be down the pub with;)
     
    Posted: Apr 28, 2011 By: Matt1959 Member since: Sep 8, 2006
  15. RedEvo

    RedEvo UKBF Legend Free Member

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    I'm steaming towards 50 myself but I don't think we can create well paid jobs for the over 50's doing things nobody actually needs simply because they have a skill and need a decent wage? Never going to happen.

    At 50 you've got at least 20 years work left in you, re-training would seem the only option, or create a job by starting a small business perhaps.

    It's a tough nut to crack and it's the same at the other end. Doing a degree and being 21/22 isn't going to guarantee a job if your degree isn't in demand in the work place.

    Anyone who thinks because they have a skill they deserve a job and a decent wage irrespective of the demand for that skill needs to re-evaluate in my view.

    At 47 years of age I fully expect to re-train (again) before I puff my last, and that will be the fourth time.

    d
     
    Posted: Apr 28, 2011 By: RedEvo Member since: May 12, 2007
  16. Really, you look so much older.

    (Yes I can't spell my name, I blame it on being bought up for most of my life in a single parent family.)
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2011
    Posted: Apr 28, 2011 By: W Mountanbatten-Windsor Member since: Apr 28, 2011
  17. JohnnyCash

    JohnnyCash Guest

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    Surprised to see someone in the SEO game say that! Do you not think it will continue to be a viable job, or do you just not want to do it any more?
     
    Posted: Apr 28, 2011 By: JohnnyCash Member since: Dec 8, 2010
  18. Dawg

    Dawg UKBF Newcomer Free Member

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    Whatever your age and whatever your field unless you are aware of change, willing to adopt it and realistically accept that always moving forward is the only option; that is retraining/changing career/accepting new status, you will be sidelined, and from there probably discarded.
    Jobs for life, (here, in Europe and the USA), are as dim a memory as the concept of 'salary-man' in Japan, and nobody, nobody is immune.
    Employment reliant on physical labour went first, but technology is remorseless; software now does the work of paralegals and junior lawyers in the USA: trained, qualified young lawyers are unemployed and retraining. The same is happening in many fields.
    Thus the advice given here, though hard for some to stomach, is true. The devil take the hindmost in the race for jobs, whether you are qualified, retrained or desperate.
    As a society we can try to make unemployment less uncomfortable while we strive to create jobs. Overtaxing the rich reduces tax revenue hindering any government funded approaches to job creation, but also in my view, takes money from a vibrant part of society which would create more jobs at less cost than the leaden hand of the state.
    Which brings us sorta back OT.
     
    Posted: Apr 28, 2011 By: Dawg Member since: Feb 12, 2006
  19. RedEvo

    RedEvo UKBF Legend Free Member

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    I follow my heart, if what I'm doing stops exciting me I do something else.

    d
     
    Posted: Apr 28, 2011 By: RedEvo Member since: May 12, 2007
  20. sirearl

    sirearl UKBF Legend Free Member

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    yup hard choice.

    The leaden hand of the state against the greed of the multinationals.

    Gonna have to talk to Fred down the boozer.:|


    Earl
     
    Posted: Apr 28, 2011 By: sirearl Member since: Apr 23, 2007
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