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Titles of senior management.

Discussion in 'General Business Forum' started by JayT16, Feb 20, 2013.

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  1. JayT16

    JayT16 UKBF Contributor Free Member

    46 3
    Hi all

    Having a discussion (argument) as to the best titles of senior managers in a private limited company.

    Whats peoples opinions.

    Sent from my GT-N7100 using UK Business Forums
     
    Posted: Feb 20, 2013 By: JayT16 Member since: Aug 16, 2012
    #1
  2. Alan

    Alan UKBF Legend Full Member - Verified Business

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    Size of company?

    Reason for titles?

    Generally titles are an internal status issue and if you want to create a fixed hierarchical structure, necessary in some organisations where control is important (e.g. the Army) and less important in a dynamic creative environment.

    Normally external people don't care a jot about titles, they know if they are talking to an oily rag or an organ grinder by what they say and do for them.
     
    Posted: Feb 20, 2013 By: Alan Member since: Aug 16, 2011
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  3. JayT16

    JayT16 UKBF Contributor Free Member

    46 3
    Start up business.

    Was debating between director and ceo for the owner.

    Sent from my GT-N7100 using UK Business Forums
     
    Posted: Feb 20, 2013 By: JayT16 Member since: Aug 16, 2012
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  4. Alan

    Alan UKBF Legend Full Member - Verified Business

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    How many staff?
     
    Posted: Feb 20, 2013 By: Alan Member since: Aug 16, 2011
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  5. JEREMY HAWKE

    JEREMY HAWKE UKBF Legend Full Member

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    You can call yourself CEO and make a loss ,
    You can call yourself the bloke in the office with a bold head and make a profit of 20 million .

    It does not matter what you call yourself its weather you can produce the numbers that matters most
     
    Posted: Feb 20, 2013 By: JEREMY HAWKE Member since: Mar 4, 2008
    #5
  6. JayT16

    JayT16 UKBF Contributor Free Member

    46 3
    Owner n manager at present. Plans for approx 15-20 in first year.


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    Posted: Feb 20, 2013 By: JayT16 Member since: Aug 16, 2012
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  7. Alan

    Alan UKBF Legend Full Member - Verified Business

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    My vote would be Director. Agree with above comments, but it is something to put on the business card that says 'boss'.

    CEO only really has value when you have multiple exec, CIO, CTO, CFO, COO, CRO that all need ego inflating titles.
     
    Posted: Feb 20, 2013 By: Alan Member since: Aug 16, 2011
    #7
  8. JayT16

    JayT16 UKBF Contributor Free Member

    46 3
    Thank you, my thoughts exactly.

    I think that a too "affluent" title can have a negative impact on the company due to the feeling of being too expensive and run by pompous gits.

    Sent from my GT-N7100 using UK Business Forums
     
    Posted: Feb 20, 2013 By: JayT16 Member since: Aug 16, 2012
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  9. maxine

    maxine UKBF Legend Full Member

    6,571 2,023
    The other thing about titles is that Director of a limited company demonstrate that person is in a position to make contractual decisions that bind the company so it has a practical purpose too :)
     
    Posted: Feb 20, 2013 By: maxine Member since: Oct 13, 2007
    #9
  10. silliker

    silliker UKBF Newcomer Free Member

    31 1
    Maybe this can help..

    Chairman of the Board – presiding officer of the corporate Board of Directors. The Chairman influences the board of directors, which in turn elects and removes the officers of a corporation and oversees the human, financial, environmental and technical operations of a corporation.

    The Chief Executive Officer (CEO) presides over the executive board and the chairman presides over the supervisory board, and different people often hold these two roles. This ensures a distinction between management by the executive board and governance by the supervisory board. This allows for clear lines of authority.

    The President is legally recognized highest “titled” corporate officer outside of the CEO (who ranks highest). The President works directly for the Board of Directors and usually a member of the Board of Directors. There is much variation; often the CEO also holds the title of President, while a Chairman and CEO’s deputy is often the President and COO. The President is often more focused upon daily operations compared to the CEO, which is supposed to be the visionary.

    The chief financial officer (CFO) is a corporate officer primarily responsible for managing the financial risks of the corporation. This officer is also responsible for financial planning and record keeping, as well as financial reporting to higher management.

    The chief information officer (CIO) is a job title for the board-level head of information technology within an organization. The CIO typically reports to the chief operations officer or the chief executive officer. The prominence of the CIO position has risen greatly as information technology has become a more important part of business. In some organizations, the CIO may be a member of the executive board of the organization.

    A chief technology officer (CTO) is an executive position whose holder is focused on scientific and technical issues within an organization. Essentially, a CTO is responsible for the transformation of capital – be it monetary, intellectual, or political – into technology in furtherance of the company’s objectives.

    A chief Strategy Officer (CSO) is an executive who is responsible for assisting the chief executive officer with creating, communicating, executing, and sustaining strategic initiatives within a corporation. A typical CSO is not a pure strategist that creates long-term planning that is isolated from the corporation’s current initiatives. Chief Strategy Officers are normally executives who have worn many hats before at a corporation before taking on the responsibilities and tasks that come with the job title.

    A chief operating officer or chief operations officer (COO) is a corporate officer responsible for managing the day-to-day activities of the corporation and for operations management (OM). The COO is one of the highest-ranking members of an organization’s senior management, monitoring the daily operations of the company and reporting to the board of directors and the top executive officer, usually the chief executive officer (CEO). The COO is usually an executive or senior officer.

    The chief Marketing Officer (CMO) is a corporate title referring to an executive responsible for various marketing in an organization. Most often the position reports to the chief executive officer. With primary or shared responsibility for areas such as sales management, product development, distribution channel management, public relations, marketing communications (including advertising and promotions), pricing, market research, and customer service, CMOs are faced with a diverse range of specialized disciplines in which they are forced to be knowledgeable. This challenge is compounded by the fact that the day-to-day activities of these functions, which range from the highly analytical (eg. – pricing and market research) to highly creative (advertising and promotions), are carried out by subordinates possessing learning and cognitive styles to which the CMO must adapt his or her own leadership style.

    Vice President – Middle or upper manager in a corporation. Depending on the corporate structure Vice Presidents report to the President, who will in turn report to the Chief Officer of their respective division, who will then report to the CEO. They often appear in various hierarchical layers such as Executive Vice President, Senior Vice President, Associate Vice President, or Assistant Vice President, with EVP usually considered the highest. Many times, corporate officers such as the CFO, COO, CIO, CTO, Secretary, or Treasurer will concurrently hold Vice President titles, commonly EVP or SVP. Vice Presidents in small companies are also referred to as chiefs of a certain division, such as VP of Finance, or VP of Administration. These titles are the same as CFO and such titles. It is not necessary to have a Vice President in most corporations.

    from michelbesner.com
     
    Posted: Feb 20, 2013 By: silliker Member since: Sep 28, 2012
    #10
  11. TOKN

    TOKN UKBF Regular Free Member

    101 16
    The point was made early on. Until you have a large operation with a head office and sub-locations and a board of directorship to sit with then it makes no sense to make yourself the CEO.

    I know sole traders who mark theirselves as CEO of their business. It's not necessarily inaccurate but it is certainly unnecessary. In a business with under 50 staff giving yourself an acronym for a job title just erects a barrier of pompousness (brilliant word) between you and your staff.
     
    Posted: Feb 21, 2013 By: TOKN Member since: Sep 27, 2012
    #11
  12. JEREMY HAWKE

    JEREMY HAWKE UKBF Legend Full Member

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    Well done Tiger !! The type of person that worries about such things as this has probably spent most of the start up up money on a Bentley lease :D

    There are so many reasons not to worry about this

    Blockbusters head of company CEO

    HMV head of company CEO

    I bet their not so flash with there business cards now :)
     
    Posted: Feb 21, 2013 By: JEREMY HAWKE Member since: Mar 4, 2008
    #12
  13. Alan

    Alan UKBF Legend Full Member - Verified Business

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    No it doesn't help, an opinion was wanted, not definitions!
     
    Posted: Feb 21, 2013 By: Alan Member since: Aug 16, 2011
    #13
  14. JEREMY HAWKE

    JEREMY HAWKE UKBF Legend Full Member

    4,117 1,292

    Ok then

    Global Director AND CEO
    of
    Bob & Bills Window Cleaning (No job too small but many too big)
     
    Posted: Feb 21, 2013 By: JEREMY HAWKE Member since: Mar 4, 2008
    #14
  15. TOKN

    TOKN UKBF Regular Free Member

    101 16
    Haha. Must admit I laughed out loud sat at my desk. That's precisely the point. I see it all the time, another example is when people start up a business and worry more about the quantity of their Facebook likes than how many conversions it actually brings them.

    You have to consider the value and cost of each sale you make in business and if your spending marketing money and competition funds to bring in the Facebook likes and they don't produce any revenue then you're lost.

    To bring it back to the main topic the focus of your job, whatever title you give it, is to add •real• value to the business. A swanky business card doesn't get you on the FTSE 500.
     
    Posted: Feb 21, 2013 By: TOKN Member since: Sep 27, 2012
    #15
  16. TOKN

    TOKN UKBF Regular Free Member

    101 16
    Feel as though I drifted but the core of what I said, with hindsight, was relevant.
     
    Posted: Feb 21, 2013 By: TOKN Member since: Sep 27, 2012
    #16
  17. MikeJ

    MikeJ UKBF Big Shot Free Member

    5,679 1,632
    Most weeks, the following scene takes place in our office....


    Phone rings.
    Marion answers the phone.
    "It's Sue from XXX. Wants to speak to the Managing Director".
    Everyone in the office looks at everyone else.
    I say "Oh, I'll do it then. Though I'd like one of you to take a bloody turn some time".

    If you're worrying about job titles before you've taken on your first employee, I'd give up now. Your cash flow is wrong, as you've not paid it enough attention.
     
    Posted: Feb 21, 2013 By: MikeJ Member since: Jan 15, 2008
    #17
  18. JEREMY HAWKE

    JEREMY HAWKE UKBF Legend Full Member

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    I feel that I may have to offer some very sensible input (I will be serious for 15 minutes this morning )

    I have a Business card in my card folder from a customer that owns several large printing companies . He is a very down to earth man but a multimillionaire made from the ground no silver spoons down here !!

    He has his

    COMPANY NAME

    PRESENTED BY

    NAME

    I think presented by is very good and eye catching as it portrays the brand and the company . All his staff have this on their cards there apprears to be no need for staff titles when you do this as ,as far as Im aware most people in most companies already have a name
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2013
    Posted: Feb 21, 2013 By: JEREMY HAWKE Member since: Mar 4, 2008
    #18
  19. Talay

    Talay UKBF Big Shot Free Member

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    The comment about the inclusion of the word "director" is valid because it is usually directors who have contractual legitimacy.

    Cards can carry director, founder, no title etc. without much ado but CEO of Donny's Sweet Shop is overinflated.
     
    Posted: Feb 21, 2013 By: Talay Member since: Mar 12, 2012
    #19
  20. muppetdave

    muppetdave UKBF Contributor Free Member

    89 22
    I think some people get too hung up on titles at times.

    Whilst I am Managing Director of my two businesses, but I also clean the toilets, and sometimes feel perhaps the title "MD and Chief Hygiene Operative" is a more suitable title. A friend is a one man band satellite installer, yet he is dead set on calling himself CEO. Personally I think it looks daft.

    As someone mentioned, if there is a bit of a hierarchy, [Managing] Director is quite apt if contractual documents etc. are to be signed.
     
    Posted: Feb 21, 2013 By: muppetdave Member since: Oct 28, 2008
    #20
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