Racism in TV and film.

Discussion in 'Time Out' started by Andrew Chambers, Jan 28, 2016.

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  1. Andrew Chambers

    Andrew Chambers Banned

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    So yesterday I watched Midsommer Murders, so noticeable the out of proportion number of coloured/half cast actors for a "Cotswold" county. All because the programme was criticised for being racist due to the lack of coloured actors, now at least 30% of the cast were coloured.

    Tonight I'm watching Death in Paradise. Only one white actor in the entire episode. Should I be offended?

    All the black actors moaning about this year's Oscars and lack of black nominations. Have the really forgotten Twelve Years A Slave just a couple of years ago?

    It's about time coloured actors started to concentrate on their trade and skills (Lenny Henry!!!!) rather call the racist card when it doesn't go their way.

    So, as a middle aged, white, English family man, what "ism" can I claim when things don't go the way I would have hoped they had?

    Rant over.

    EDIT

    And don't get me started on the Mobo awards, imagine the outrage if we had Mowo awards!
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2016
    Posted: Jan 28, 2016 By: Andrew Chambers Member since: Sep 21, 2015
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  2. simon field

    simon field UKBF Big Shot Full Member - Verified Business

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    None. Don't let what other people are doing with their lives bother you so much.

    Throw away your television.

    Two ideas, hope they help ;)
     
    Posted: Jan 28, 2016 By: simon field Member since: Feb 4, 2011
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  3. Wavecrest Ltd

    Wavecrest Ltd UKBF Enthusiast Full Member

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    I'm with you Andrew. Watching ****ensian and I'm pretty sure Little Nell wasn't black when I read the book.
     
    Posted: Jan 29, 2016 By: Wavecrest Ltd Member since: Oct 31, 2007
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  4. simon field

    simon field UKBF Big Shot Full Member - Verified Business

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    Worrying about the colour of someone's skin (that you saw on television) is tantamount to having a political debate with a cat.

    Seriously, can you not find something better to do?
     
    Posted: Jan 29, 2016 By: simon field Member since: Feb 4, 2011
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  5. Mr A P Davies

    Mr A P Davies UKBF Regular Free Member

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    I'm so glad I don't watch telly.
    Couldn't quite understand why 12 years a slave was so highly rated. Good story, poor film, I thought, but I guess I'm more of a Django Unchained man.
    Both good insights into what put the Great in Great Britain though.
     
    Posted: Jan 29, 2016 By: Mr A P Davies Member since: Sep 16, 2015
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  6. myfairworld

    myfairworld UKBF Regular Free Member

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    I'm with Simon. Actors are 'acting' not portraying themselves. Midsomer murders is fiction for heaven's sake. Carry on down the road of complete authenticity and you'll reach the stage where only those already convicted as serial murderers can play the part of serial murderers. N.B. If ****ens was writing today Little Nell very probably would be black - or a Syrian refugee.
     
    Posted: Jan 29, 2016 By: myfairworld Member since: May 14, 2015
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  7. The Byre

    The Byre UKBF Ace Free Member

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    You guys just do not understand the problem. The film industry is structurally racist, especially in the US. It is not the fault of those in the industry - you could hardly find a more liberal and open minded group, but the pathways to success are so extremely elitist, that women and racial minorities find it very difficult to break in.

    This has lead to instances of tokenism and sometimes that can backfire.

    What outsiders to the movie game don't understand is that in order to work behind the camera in the UK, you must get into the National Film and Television School (or get very lucky). If you want to record the music for film and TV, you have to be a graduate of the Surrey Uni Tonmeister course. If you want to work in front of the camera, you either attend RADA or LAMDA, or you get very lucky.

    Of course people enter the business from left-field, either through sheer luck, money or bloody-minded determination. But wherever you look, you keep seeing people from the same places.

    The same elitist structures exist in the US. There are two schools for crews and directors, so everybody knows one another and recommendations for rising talent come via alumni. The view is, OK, it's a bit of a Mafia, but at least you know what you are getting. You know that the kid from the Film School of the USC or NYU will come up to a certain (very, very high) standard, just as you will know that the sound engineer from Surrey's Tonmeister course will understand orchestration and be able to read a score. Anybody graduating from RADA or LAMDA will be able to turn in a good performance in any genre.

    Many would say, this is as it should be. Excellence should be rewarded and why should a director risk his career by hiring graduates from a second or third-rate school!

    The only problem is, the white middle-classes are very, very good at elbowing their way into these schools.

    Result - it is quite normal to attend a movie shoot where everybody behind the camera is white and all key personnel, such as camera, focus-puller, grips, cinematographer, gaffa, sound are male. Make-up, continuity and casting are often female and often do not come from the top schools, but these roles are not usually pathways to the top.

    Because of the way that society is structured today, racial minorities usually do not have the tools to get into the elitist schools - and this is true for nearly all career fields, not just film.

    ALSO

    There is a gross misconception that English society a couple of hundred years ago was all-white. At the time of the Battle of Trafalgar, one sailor in eight was black. It you look at the relief at the base of Nelson's Column, one of the sailors at Nelson's side is obviously black.

    A black Little Nell? Why not? People were coming into the UK from all over the World and they were not all white! But movies, paintings and histories have painted black people out, as if they just were not there!
    ____________________________________

    My verdict, however, on Little Nell is the same as Oscar Wilde's "One must have a heart of stone to read the death of little Nell without laughing."
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2016
    Posted: Jan 29, 2016 By: The Byre Member since: Aug 13, 2013
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  8. simon field

    simon field UKBF Big Shot Full Member - Verified Business

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    Excellent.

    To the 'bothered' ones - just think of it as redressing the balance and I'm sure you'll be fine.
     
    Posted: Jan 29, 2016 By: simon field Member since: Feb 4, 2011
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  9. john1989

    john1989 Guest

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    Interesting topic, Andrew.


    Whilst it is ‘just a TV show’, I feel that a show, particularly serious dramas should try and reflect accurately their storyline. I would be put off watching a show about Harlem in the 1970’s to find that the cast is predominantly white.


    Regarding the Oscars, perhaps this year there were no black actors that were good enough for a nomination. Is it as simple as that?

    Incidently, there were no nominations for white players for the NBA player of the year award. Is that racism, or just a fact that there were no good players that happened to be white?


    Eminem is a white rapper in an almost all black industry. He has won many awards. The fact is, if you are good enough, you will be nominated for awards.
     
    Posted: Jan 29, 2016 By: john1989 Member since: Jan 1, 1970
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  10. Andrew Chambers

    Andrew Chambers Banned

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    Personally I'm not bothered. It's the untalented (Lenny Henry is a prime example) who kick up a fuss about nothing and call the race/ageism card because they can't get a job.

    Not sure what balance needs addressing. It never occurred to me that The Cosby Show or Desmond's were racist. On the women ageists claim, well they've all had the day playing young bints. Do we really want to see Maggie Smith in a bikini rubbing up against Daniel Craig, or Helen Mirran being cast as the lead of The Hunger Games? It's just ridiculous.
     
    Posted: Jan 29, 2016 By: Andrew Chambers Member since: Sep 21, 2015
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  11. simon field

    simon field UKBF Big Shot Full Member - Verified Business

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    Oh dear, are you just confused then?
     
    Posted: Jan 29, 2016 By: simon field Member since: Feb 4, 2011
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  12. Andrew Chambers

    Andrew Chambers Banned

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    Not all, it's the hypocrisy I don't care for. I.e It's ok to have a 99.9% black cast when a program it's set in the Caribbean (fair enough, that's the population out there and it's therefore correctly portrayeyd. To be honest it hadn't even occurred to me until last night, after seeing the farce of actors in Midsommer the night before). However, set a show in white middle England (pop down to the Cotswolds, or Wallingford and the surrounding area, and you will very few coloured people), with 99.9% white actors and it's racist. That's what I don't like.
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2016
    Posted: Jan 29, 2016 By: Andrew Chambers Member since: Sep 21, 2015
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  13. simon field

    simon field UKBF Big Shot Full Member - Verified Business

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    Then don't watch it. It's not rocket science.
     
    Posted: Jan 29, 2016 By: simon field Member since: Feb 4, 2011
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  14. john1989

    john1989 Guest

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    I thought this could have been an interesting discussion to be honest.
    Instead it has resulted in one sentence snipes. No surprise though.
     
    Posted: Jan 29, 2016 By: john1989 Member since: Jan 1, 1970
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  15. tony84

    tony84 UKBF Big Shot Free Member

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    Your thread made me smile, I completely understand your post but if you used some of the terms you used in the black community it may not go down too well..

    In my mind how you word things does not really matter, its more abut the intent - although I am sure others would disagree.
     
    Posted: Jan 29, 2016 By: tony84 Member since: Apr 14, 2008
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  16. Karimbo

    Karimbo UKBF Ace Free Member

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    I think black people are over-represented. There seems to be a quote for ethnic minority actors and the quota seems to get filled with black people. Not all ethnic minorities are black. I guess black people tend to have Christian names and are much more assimilated. You wont get a black person whose 1st or 2nd generation African migrant but almost always afro Caribbean.

    I don't think the numbers themslves are racist but they are sometimes portrayed.

    Take for instance this justeat ad. This ad implies the white woman is have some sort of affiar with this black man right under the white partners nose. It's all implied, but I'm surprised there hasn't been an outrage over this.
     
    Posted: Jan 29, 2016 By: Karimbo Member since: Nov 5, 2011
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  17. The Byre

    The Byre UKBF Ace Free Member

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    I bet white supremacists everywhere were in outrage!
     
    Posted: Jan 29, 2016 By: The Byre Member since: Aug 13, 2013
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  18. john1989

    john1989 Guest

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    Imagine East is East without Pakistanis. It just isn't the same and works both ways.
    Racism doesn't come into.
    Though Om Puri that played the father was actually Indian.
     
    Posted: Jan 29, 2016 By: john1989 Member since: Jan 1, 1970
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  19. Andrew Chambers

    Andrew Chambers Banned

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    Take it to the next level, so Hollywood is being accused of racism, where does that leave Bollywood then?
     
    Posted: Jan 29, 2016 By: Andrew Chambers Member since: Sep 21, 2015
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  20. john1989

    john1989 Guest

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    It's rubbish in my view.

    I think they are kicking up a fuss for one reason only; free PR.
     
    Posted: Jan 29, 2016 By: john1989 Member since: Jan 1, 1970
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