Forwarding domestic landline to mobile?

Discussion in 'General Business Forum' started by yourownHR_Pamela, Aug 30, 2012.

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  1. yourownHR_Pamela

    yourownHR_Pamela UKBF Newcomer Free Member

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    Hi
    Has anyone done this? It suited us just to use our domestic landline as a business number as we never use it really, but as things pick up, I;m just worried about missed calls when I am out and about , I prefer to respond quickly to things, has anyone managed to set up this without ridiculous fees etc? The thought of calling virgin media on this and opening the flood gates to business customer sales calls from them makes me want to stick pins in my eyes!
    Thanks in advance!
     
    Posted: Aug 30, 2012 By: yourownHR_Pamela Member since: Aug 30, 2012
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  2. Talay

    Talay UKBF Big Shot Free Member

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    Forwarding a domestic landline to a mobile is non viable for any volume of calls due to excessive fees and probable lack of user interface to turn it on and off.

    You could use a gizmo to forward calls with a SIM card. Google landline SIM.

    However, IMHO the best bet is to get a virtual number on VOIP and have that forwarded to your mobile. Costs range from 10p plus VAT per minute at the top end to a bit less than this with some suppliers.

    You could also get a service which rings on both your landline and your mobile at the same time and you answer on whichever is easiest for you at the time.
     
    Posted: Aug 31, 2012 By: Talay Member since: Mar 12, 2012
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  3. simonclark123

    simonclark123 UKBF Contributor Free Member

    92 10
    Hi

    I have done this for many customers - several options for you:

    1) I can supply you with a Call Forwarding Terminal into which you put a sim card on the same network as your own mobile, so as to ensure that calls between the sims are free - cost typically £10-£15 per month for the extra sim.

    2) I can supply you with an Orange Solo Business 'Unlimited' sim (special half price offer at the moment just £28.46 per month) - this comes with Orange Pocket Landline where you have a virtual landline number which maps onto your mobile (this can be a new landline number or you may be able to port your existing landline number). I can also supply you with a similar Vodafone sim (One Net Express) - but no special offer at present.

    3) Finally - and maybe the first to check out - some BT and Virgin plans allow you to phone BT and Virgin mobile phones respectively free of charge - but do check specifically that this includes diverted calls.

    Best Regards

    Simon Clark at Business Telecoms dot com
     
    Posted: Aug 31, 2012 By: simonclark123 Member since: Nov 8, 2011
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  4. Paul_Rosser

    Paul_Rosser UKBF Big Shot Full Member - Verified Business

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    Posted: Aug 31, 2012 By: Paul_Rosser Member since: Jul 5, 2012
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  5. money24seven

    money24seven UKBF Newcomer Free Member

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    I regularily divert my BT landline to my O2 mobile and it works good. I believe there are some services that will automatically divert to a mobile if the landline is not answered but will the customer hold for all this to happen
     
    Posted: Aug 31, 2012 By: money24seven Member since: May 12, 2012
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  6. Paul_Rosser

    Paul_Rosser UKBF Big Shot Full Member - Verified Business

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    On the guide I posted Virgin have the option to divert if not answered after 6 rings and also to divert if the landline is engaged, which could be handy.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2012
    Posted: Aug 31, 2012 By: Paul_Rosser Member since: Jul 5, 2012
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  7. Ashley_Price

    Ashley_Price UKBF Legend Full Member - Verified Business

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    This will work to an extent with regard to not missing calls, but what about while you are driving or meeting clients? The call still ends up going to voicemail.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2012
    Posted: Aug 31, 2012 By: Ashley_Price Member since: Feb 9, 2008
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  8. Steve Sellers

    Steve Sellers UKBF Big Shot Full Member - Verified Business

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    If you are not receiving a large amount of calls then it will be fine. I can turn transfer to my mobile on and off with ease.


    Hands free set? Answering calls when you are with a client is not ideal, but depending on relationship with the client it can be done without trouble(I dont generally do it though).
     
    Posted: Aug 31, 2012 By: Steve Sellers Member since: Aug 7, 2011
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  9. Ashley_Price

    Ashley_Price UKBF Legend Full Member - Verified Business

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    Still not good. We answer a lot of calls from people using a hands-free set - often difficult to hear them as they sound far away and, if they have the car window open then can hear other noises which can drown them out. Also signal can start to break up if driving in heavily built-up areas.

    You should never answer calls when you're with a client - especially if they're paying for your time.
     
    Posted: Aug 31, 2012 By: Ashley_Price Member since: Feb 9, 2008
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  10. Steve Sellers

    Steve Sellers UKBF Big Shot Full Member - Verified Business

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    Invest in a decent hands free kit and it isn't an issue.

    I disagree about the never answer the call point. That gives no account to a relationship with a client. If the client is another business they know calls need answering...so long as your not talking for long e.g. "hi I am in a meeting I will call you back in ten". Which at the end of the day is no different to what a call answering service would do. It has to be judged on a common sense level - i.e. will the client think I am being rude? If the answer is yes then dont answer the call. Simple.
     
    Posted: Aug 31, 2012 By: Steve Sellers Member since: Aug 7, 2011
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  11. Ashley_Price

    Ashley_Price UKBF Legend Full Member - Verified Business

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    Yes it is, you cannot truly split your thinking process between driving and talking on the phone (hands-free or otherwise), especially if the caller is asking you technical or complex questions. Plus, also the signal breaking up.

    A "message taking service" might do that... a proper call handling service would be able to do so much more (if given the right information by the client of course).
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2012
    Posted: Aug 31, 2012 By: Ashley_Price Member since: Feb 9, 2008
    #11
  12. Jet Virtual

    Jet Virtual UKBF Enthusiast Full Member

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    Have you thought about what would happen if your mobile is low on battery or has bad signal? My new Samsung GS3 has the worst battery life!
     
    Posted: Aug 31, 2012 By: Jet Virtual Member since: Mar 21, 2011
    #12
  13. Steve Sellers

    Steve Sellers UKBF Big Shot Full Member - Verified Business

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    Yes. Technical or complex questions? I don't advise on brain surgery whilst driving. Never ever have the problem with signal either(unless going through a tunnel which is rare to say the least)

    What even complex and technical info?

    How would a proper call handling service advise a client of mine who rings up, for example, and says one of their employees has just done something illegal and needs sacking on the spot.....or a client who has just had a visit from the environmental health and need advice there and then?

    The bottom line is neither is a proper solution. Client's dont like leaving messages, they like to speak to someone immediately. They don't care about the fact one has other clients, are driving or anything else. It's all about them, and I don't blame them. To many businesses lose the personal touch imo.
     
    Posted: Aug 31, 2012 By: Steve Sellers Member since: Aug 7, 2011
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  14. Ashley_Price

    Ashley_Price UKBF Legend Full Member - Verified Business

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    Well, we currently have a wide-range of knowledge on massage tables, children's clothes and furniture, rope cutters, footfall counters, etc. We can only answer questions that we have been provided with the answers to (or which we can access quickly) by the client.

    There is always going to be some information that we cannot give. We are not legal advisers, so it wouldn't be ethical or maybe even legal for us to give some information.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2012
    Posted: Aug 31, 2012 By: Ashley_Price Member since: Feb 9, 2008
    #14
  15. David Griffiths

    David Griffiths UKBF Legend Full Member - Verified Business

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    I agree wholeheartedly with this, but experience tells me that I'm swimming against the tide. It seems common practice for people to bring their phones into meetings and answer them whenever they ring.

    To me, that's just ignorant - you are saying to the other person, sorry but you're just not important enough to get my undivided attention.

    If it's that important that the caller knows that you are in a meeting, tailor your voicemail message. Something along the lines of

    "Thanks for callling (name) on Friday 31 August. I'm in a meeting with a customer/whatever at the moment, but I expect to be free at 4.30. Please leave a message and I'll get back to you"

    As I've said, I'm in a minority on this, but I will never answer a call when with somebody else. Normally the phone does get switched to silent before starting.
     
    Posted: Aug 31, 2012 By: David Griffiths Member since: Jun 21, 2008
    #15
  16. cjd

    cjd UKBF Legend Full Member - Verified Business

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    Sure, we have several thousand customers just doing this. You can divert a call to anywhere and change it as often as you like.

    It's worth pointing out though that if you're just wanting to answer calls at home, you're better off buying a VoIP phone (or using a free softphone on your PC/laptop) so that you can take the call directly without needing to pay for a divert. That way you can also make outbound calls without jamming up your domestic line and have a proper business number.

    Info on call divert here:
    http://www.voipfone.co.uk/Call_Forwarding_And_Divert.php

    Give us a call on monday or email anytime support at voipfone co uk.
     
    Posted: Aug 31, 2012 By: cjd Member since: Nov 23, 2005
    #16
  17. yourownHR_Pamela

    yourownHR_Pamela UKBF Newcomer Free Member

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    Thanks so much everyone, I didn't get any email updates to this so didn't know I had so many replies until I logged back in!
     
    Posted: Sep 3, 2012 By: yourownHR_Pamela Member since: Aug 30, 2012
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