Camera for Product Photography

Discussion in 'General Business Forum' started by littlebusiness, Feb 18, 2009.

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  1. da8iwr

    da8iwr UKBF Newcomer Free Member

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    I didn't mention the European equivalent models, as i think at the moment they are more expensive than the UK versions, as the Euro has just dropped below the GBP. Most cameras are sold in each country for about the same number of units of currency, such as £500 = $500, but its the exchange rate that makes it better or worse.

    I used to sell cameras as a side line in about 2000 - 2004, I would buy them from USA for the same price in dollars as you would sell them for in pounds here, so i would make the profit on the exchange rate. EBay has killed that market though.

    Also what difference would there be between a 2.8 lens on a compact camera or an SLR with a small APS-C sensor like used in cameras with a 1.6 magnification (such as the SLRs we have been talking about in this thread, 450D, 1000D etc), and what advantage is there of buying a compact over an SLR?

    To get the whole object in as close to full focus as possible because of Depth of field, you need to have a smaller aperture such as F32, not wider such as 2.8.

    In product photography this doesn't matter as you just lift the exposure time and pop the camera on a steady ground such a s tripod or bean bag.
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2009
    Posted: Sep 23, 2009 By: da8iwr Member since: Oct 16, 2006
  2. justguy

    justguy UKBF Contributor Free Member

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    The sensors in compact cameras are smaller even than the APS-C - my ikkle G9, even at f2.8 has quite amazing DoF. The 5DII with a 2.8 lens is lovely and shallow. Stop down to F8 or so and all is perfect (assuming ISO100).

    Indeed - the only reason I mentioned a larger aperture was that many people doing product shots do not have sufficient lighting or knowledge to get F32 or even F22. Also, these longer exposures give rise to significantly more noise as well as diffraction issues. F8-11 seems to be a common sweet spot - and on a compact, the DoF will be far greater than most shots will need (and not sufficient on a full frame camera).

    Alternatively, I have seen recent examples of focus stacking working brilliantly for product shots; gets you all the advantages of a tilt lens at the sweet spot of F8 or so.
     
    Posted: Sep 23, 2009 By: justguy Member since: Sep 23, 2009
  3. KING Professional Photography

    KING Professional Photography UKBF Ace Free Member

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    Just to follow up on what reynoldsdigital said

    The camera is fairly irrelevant, If you know how to set it up, and you understand lighting, and heve the correct lighting gear you will be OK

    Product photography is awkward, especially as you are specifically dealing with totally different products. The thing most people forget is that you need to light both the background and the subject properley. because the texture of your subjects differs, you will need to be able to mix hard and soft lighting. This level of lighting control isnt particularly cheap
     
    Posted: Sep 24, 2009 By: KING Professional Photography Member since: Jun 30, 2009
  4. Matt1959

    Matt1959 UKBF Legend Free Member

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    Posted: Sep 24, 2009 By: Matt1959 Member since: Sep 8, 2006
  5. KING Professional Photography

    KING Professional Photography UKBF Ace Free Member

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    I can vouch for that. The gear on the www.lencarta.com website is 1 notch up from that
     
    Posted: Sep 24, 2009 By: KING Professional Photography Member since: Jun 30, 2009
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