Brexit Negotiations

Discussion in 'Time Out' started by Scott-Copywriter, Jun 19, 2017.

  1. Cobby

    Cobby UKBF Ace Free Member

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    How do you think the UK and 27 other EU nations (i.e. The EU) are trying to "take full control" of the UK? Why do you think that's likely?


    I agree on these points, although as with most anger directed against the EU, it's anger better directed at the government for their choices. However, if your genuine concern is for the less well off, you would be against Brexit - as we covered before, Brexit will disproportionately harm the poor and most vulnerable in our society.


    I'm capable of living in a forest and surviving by foraging; there aren't any particularly large upsides to it though.
     
    Posted: Dec 29, 2018 By: Cobby Member since: Oct 28, 2009
  2. Cobby

    Cobby UKBF Ace Free Member

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    British public still believe Vote Leave ‘£350million a week to EU’ myth
    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/...money-remain-poll-boris-johnson-a8603646.html
     
    Posted: Dec 29, 2018 By: Cobby Member since: Oct 28, 2009
  3. Jeff FV

    Jeff FV UKBF Big Shot Staff Member

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    In 1992, the EU introduced a rule that any member nation had to set a VAT rate of at least 15%. Our VAT rate is currently 20%, so our government policy has been to set a rate higher than the minimum (I.e. it has taken control of setting our VAT rate).

    Some items (eg domestic fuel) have special status and have a lower minimum for VAT(5% for domestic fuel)

    Items that were not subject to VAT in a country in 1991, ie before the new rule was introduced, were exempt from the requirement to have VAT added at any rate in that country, as long as they remained free from VAT. In 1993, the the Tory government imposed 8% VAT on domestic fuel bills, thereby removing this exemption, and (whilst we remain in the EU) VAT must now be added to domestic fuel. A later Labour government reduced VAT on domestic fuel bills to 5%, the lowest value it can be whilst we are in the EU.

    It is possible that VAT may be removed from domestic fuel when we leave, although no party has said they have plans to do so. On the one hand, it would be a quick, easy policy to try and “sell” the benefits of Brexit to the public, my back of a fag packet calculation suggests it would save the average household circa £50 to £100 a year, but the hit the exchequer would be high at a time that the public purse will be under pressure.

    So yes, the EU does place some constraints upon us, but they don’t seem to have hampered U.K. policy too much.
     
    Posted: Dec 29, 2018 By: Jeff FV Member since: Jan 10, 2009
  4. atmosbob

    atmosbob UKBF Ace Free Member

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    Posted: Jan 2, 2019 By: atmosbob Member since: Oct 26, 2009
  5. Mr D

    Mr D UKBF Legend Free Member

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    Posted: Jan 2, 2019 By: Mr D Member since: Feb 12, 2017
  6. Employment Law Clinic

    Employment Law Clinic UKBF Big Shot Full Member - Verified Business

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    Posted: Jan 2, 2019 By: Employment Law Clinic Member since: Aug 10, 2009
  7. quikshop

    quikshop UKBF Big Shot Free Member

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    Sir Ivan Rogers opinion of reality is through a Europhile lense.

    His failure by association with David Cameron's attempt to negotiate migration controls with the EU ahead of the referendum discredited Rogers either on his understanding of the EU institutions or an unwillingness to put his influence to work in favour of the UK Government's position.
     
    Posted: Jan 3, 2019 By: quikshop Member since: Oct 11, 2006
  8. Newchodge

    Newchodge UKBF Big Shot Free Member

    11,743 3,032
    Which of his statements and arguments do you take exception to, and why?
     
    Posted: Jan 3, 2019 By: Newchodge Member since: Nov 8, 2012
  9. simon field

    simon field UKBF Big Shot Full Member - Verified Business

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    It’s a great big guess, either way!

    Nobody can sort this out, because nobody knows what ‘it’ even is and therefore it won’t get sorted out, let’s be honest. There’s more important matters in everybody’s lives to get on with so for goodness sake stop wasting your time and crack on with what’s in front of you! If you feel that poor people will suffer (which they will in any case) then get off your arses and do something monumental for a good cause, campaign for something meaningful for once and report back here if you manage to achieve anything more than just typing your own set of biased beliefs to a bunch of strangers on a tiny little corner of the internet.

    Otherwise anything you say is of no substance or consequence. Get behind it or give up.

    Here’s to the future, and remember - your life is the result of your choices. If you don’t like it, then make different choices
     
    Posted: Jan 4, 2019 By: simon field Member since: Feb 4, 2011
  10. Mr D

    Mr D UKBF Legend Free Member

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    Cheering you on!
     
    Posted: Jan 4, 2019 By: Mr D Member since: Feb 12, 2017
  11. Newchodge

    Newchodge UKBF Big Shot Free Member

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    Posted: Jan 7, 2019 By: Newchodge Member since: Nov 8, 2012
  12. Mr D

    Mr D UKBF Legend Free Member

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    "The ‘upside’ is that the government may be proposing less swingeing cuts than Taylor: only for a new class of ‘dependent contractor’ and not for ‘employees’. In UK law, most people with a job are employees, with rights to job security, to leave to care for children, and covered by employer contributions for National Insurance. Then, there is a larger group of ‘workers’ who must get the minimum wage, paid holidays, and be auto-enrolled in a basic workplace pension. Our courts still have not quite settled who is in each group, and the worst employers continue to exploit the lack of enforcement to evade social rights. In essence, the government seems to be saying that only non-employee workers (which it wants to rename as dependent contractors) lose the right to actual holidays."

    "Only people with real autonomy, like a law firm partner, or a highly paid plumber, will be non-employee workers."

    How much holiday do these non-employee workers currently get?
     
    Posted: Jan 7, 2019 By: Mr D Member since: Feb 12, 2017
  13. Newchodge

    Newchodge UKBF Big Shot Free Member

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    The same as every employee - 5.6 weeks, and if you read the whole piece, while the Supreme Court may think that only people with real autonomy are workers, the real world does not reflect that, apart from Uber and Deliveroo, how about all the threads on here about employing a self employed person.
     
    Posted: Jan 7, 2019 By: Newchodge Member since: Nov 8, 2012
  14. Mr D

    Mr D UKBF Legend Free Member

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    So the supreme court make wrong decisions then?

    Oh and must tell the local plumber in the village that he should get 5.6 weeks paid holiday. Not sure who is going to pay him but I'll refer him to you on that one.
    Poor guy hasn't had a holiday since 2017.
     
    Posted: Jan 7, 2019 By: Mr D Member since: Feb 12, 2017
  15. Clinton

    Clinton UKBF Big Shot Full Member

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    Just to stir the hornet's nest .... :)

    The London Stock Exchange cleared 1000,000,000,000,000 (one thousand trillion) dollars of derivative trades in 2018. That's a very, very big number. And in a year when Brexit was supposed to scare the pants off the market and all the predictions were of derivative trade flight!

    As I've predicted all along, London sheer size and scale will make it very, very difficult for the EU. If the EU play hard ball their economies will be hit for several percentage points of GDP, their institutions will have severe problems raising money from capital markets, insurance products will collapse, credit swaps would suffer, millions will lose their jobs.
     
    Posted: Jan 8, 2019 By: Clinton Member since: Jan 17, 2010
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  16. The Byre

    The Byre UKBF Ace Free Member

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    That would be a quadrillion. 15 noughts is a quadrillion.

    I like a good stir!

    Even if that were true, they don't care!

    They don't care because -

    1. They just don't believe that it is true. They assume these deals will migrate to NY, Paris and Frankfurt.

    2. They have far more important fish to fry. AfD in Germany, GJ protests and riots in France, the economy in Italy, Portugal, Greece and Spain, right-wing extremists in E.Europe - I could go on!

    3. Brexit is not on anyone's political horizon or compass. The papers and TV are not reporting on it. Businesses are not alarmed or worried about it, esp. in Germany where capital goods, cars and machinery are going to be hardly if at all effected. If the voters don't care about Brexit, the politicians can afford to ignore it.

    4. Most politicians assume that the UK will fall in-line and either go for a soft 'Norway-Light' Brexit (i.e. May's 'deal') or they will kick the can down the road, until there is no Brexit at all.

    5. Leading political thinkers in Germany and France know their history. The last time the Tory party was riven with this type of idiotic fight (under PM Balfour) between liberal free-traders and the Old Guard, the battle lasted about ten years and events overtook them in the form of WW1. The US is $52tr in debt, China has private debt at three times its GDP and private debt-to-GDP ratios everywhere are at ABOVE 2007 levels. Situations like that are usually followed by some 'pivotal' occurrence, such as the French Revolution, WW1, WW2, The Great Depression, the list is depressingly long.

    Or as Harold MacMillan may or may not have said "Events my dear boy, events!"

    Though I prefer HG Wells statement "Today's crisis is tomorrow's joke!"
     
    Posted: Jan 8, 2019 By: The Byre Member since: Aug 13, 2013
  17. Jasondb

    Jasondb UKBF Regular Free Member

    141 9
    Boris never explained that figure and on facebook people were blaming Farage for the £350m, I corrected them,not Farage it was Boris Johnson.
    There is a theory that about 25% of our council tax hidden in the figures is going to the EU. Now if that is true added with the £12nb it might come close to £350m a week. Is it possible Boris got threatened to not divulge for fear of public anger?
     
    Posted: Jan 8, 2019 By: Jasondb Member since: Apr 23, 2018
  18. Newchodge

    Newchodge UKBF Big Shot Free Member

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    No
     
    Posted: Jan 8, 2019 By: Newchodge Member since: Nov 8, 2012
  19. atmosbob

    atmosbob UKBF Ace Free Member

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    Where does that come from? Actually UK Councils often receive funds for various projects from the EU so its actually the other way round. Only today my local council sent out a mass mailing about an adult education initiative part funded by the EU.
     
    Posted: Jan 8, 2019 By: atmosbob Member since: Oct 26, 2009
  20. Clinton

    Clinton UKBF Big Shot Full Member

    3,963 1,368
    I completely agree with you. The man on the street in Berlin or Venice doesn't give a damn.

    But if there's a hard Brexit and they start losing their jobs, taxes start going up (to compensate for lack of EU contributions from the UK), goods become more expensive, countries see negative growth and start tightening even further in a death spiral, companies can't raise finance for even ordinary things like working capital (remember, London is the EU's investment bank!), they are all screwed. Expect other countries to follow Britain before too long.

    People will start to care when they realise how bad it is.

    It's simple, really - the EU needs London, big time. The struggling Euro will head for an even earlier demise if there is a hard Brexit (and therefore limited access to London's liquidity pools, processing power, financial resources, clearing clout, institutions).
     
    Posted: Jan 8, 2019 By: Clinton Member since: Jan 17, 2010