An itch that needs scratching

Discussion in 'General Business Forum' started by Fuzzy, Jan 24, 2008.

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  1. Fuzzy

    Fuzzy UKBF Legend Free Member

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    I have a burning question......

    Why is it in web design they ask you what your budget is ?

    I mean, you don't get your garden done, ask the gardener how much will it be and he says ....."well what's your budget?, how much you got ?":eek:

    You don't have you house re-wired, ask the electrician how much it will cost and he says "depends on your budget":eek:

    You don't get your washing machine fixed, ask the plumber how much do I owe you and he says "well, depends on your budget":eek:

    Fuzzy puzzled, I need enlightened:D
     
    Posted: Jan 24, 2008 By: Fuzzy Member since: Oct 20, 2007
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  2. Interconnect IT

    Interconnect IT UKBF Ace Free Member

    1,244 195
    To be honest, it's because if you want to spend £250 on a website, you can have a £250 website. If you want to spend £25k on a website, you can have that too.

    People very rarely come to web designers and developers with a comprehensive specification. And it's not simple work, like mowing a lawn - it's complex, requires a lot of input from the client, and depends a lot on the actual business requirements.

    It also helps separate the wheat from the chaff. It's not unusual to spend an hour with a client, where he shows you a selection of £10k+ sites that he likes. You say "yes sir! No problem sir! That'll be £10k sir!" to which you get the reply "Oh, I was thinking of spending more like £250. It's only a few images and documents after all!"

    We're actually going to create a guide on pricing web work, which we'll give to all prospects. Hopefully this will improve things somewhat.

    Recently had a request to convert a solicitor's site to a WordPress theme. Looked at the job and it would be really simple. About a day's work at most, including testing and validation. Quoted £500+VAT. They said "Oh, we can't spend more than £100." I did point out that they charged £250 an hour for their services - so if they believed their website was worth only 20 minutes of their time then they should perhaps consider not bothering at all.

    Anyway, we have an answer to this problem in the form of selling high-spec off-the-shelf designs to designers and enthusiasts. Should be a big market for that.
     
    Posted: Jan 24, 2008 By: Interconnect IT Member since: Nov 15, 2007
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  3. Fuzzy

    Fuzzy UKBF Legend Free Member

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    Ah ha! Fuzzy enlightened:D
     
    Posted: Jan 24, 2008 By: Fuzzy Member since: Oct 20, 2007
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  4. ADW

    ADW UKBF Enthusiast Free Member

    1,129 171
    I guess it falls into the same categorie as the Estate Agents and Car Dealers. Ask one of these for a house or a car and they are going to ask your budget.

    If you roll out the full spec first of all they can then cost things correctly.

    Asking your budget is probably not the best way to go about it. If someone wants a website, it is obviously for a specific reason and they should ask what they require of the website. If you give a 5k budget and the website can be done with 3k many will still manage to spend the full 5k.
     
    Posted: Jan 24, 2008 By: ADW Member since: Oct 25, 2007
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  5. Fuzzy

    Fuzzy UKBF Legend Free Member

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    Very true!!!:D
     
    Posted: Jan 24, 2008 By: Fuzzy Member since: Oct 20, 2007
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  6. Comspec

    Comspec UKBF Newcomer Full Member - Verified Business

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    Frequently, I do the same when someone comes to me asking for a custom-built PC.

    If they want it all singing, all dancing, but only have a budget of £300 it ain't gonna happen and we'd be wasting both our times.

    Usually they have a figure (or small range) in mind, then I give them the options of what they can have for their budget (from lower to slightly higher)
    .

    Saves time on both sides.
     
    Posted: Jan 24, 2008 By: Comspec Member since: May 8, 2006
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  7. PI Guy

    PI Guy UKBF Newcomer Free Member

    2,495 191
    instead of the question being "How much is your budget"? It should be "what do you want the website to do"? and then quote accordingly.
     
    Posted: Jan 24, 2008 By: PI Guy Member since: Jun 20, 2006
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  8. Fuzzy

    Fuzzy UKBF Legend Free Member

    5,365 506
    I know what you mean but I agree with Salinv:D

     
    Posted: Jan 24, 2008 By: Fuzzy Member since: Oct 20, 2007
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  9. Interconnect IT

    Interconnect IT UKBF Ace Free Member

    1,244 195
    Thing is - a client should do at least some research before approaching companies.

    You'd be pretty annoyed if someone came to you, took up hours of your time asking about custom card designs, and then, when you came up with a price of £5000 for the gold and diamond encrusted jewel they wanted from you they said "Oh, but hallmark do cards for £2 - why isn't it cheaper?"

    Time is expensive, and you'd be amazed how many people expect custom work for pennies. We could end up doing nothing but writing proposals, taking a day each, for people with £200 budgets. So we have to check what their knowledge and expectation is.

    It's different if, say, General Electric approaches us.
     
    Posted: Jan 24, 2008 By: Interconnect IT Member since: Nov 15, 2007
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  10. Antonia @limeone.com

    Antonia @limeone.com UKBF Newcomer Free Member

    1,764 141
    I think it is easier for clients to be given some examples and price ranges as the questions 'what is your budget?' is off putting to most of us.

    We get asked for low cost legal docs and have introduced these into our shop, we also get asked for complex legal docs built from scratch and those are quoted for.

    A long time ago we sorted out a quote template so it could be dealt with quickly and provide the client with the information they needed without the need to get loads of personal information. It helps the sale process.
     
    Posted: Jan 24, 2008 By: Antonia @limeone.com Member since: Jan 28, 2006
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  11. ServWise

    ServWise UKBF Ace Full Member

    1,173 260
    Thats all very well but what a customer wants there site to do and what there budget allows them to do are usually very different. Also different solutions to the same requirement can be met in different ways and for different budgets. And since it can take a few hours or more to create a custom quote it can be a big waste of time if your quoting way above there budget.

    A budget or a budget range just identifies which is best solution for the quote.
     
    Posted: Jan 24, 2008 By: ServWise Member since: Jan 22, 2008
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  12. Chippie

    Chippie UKBF Newcomer Free Member

    805 140
    I agree however in the case of car dealers your budget will also determine the level of customer service you get! If you've got £5,000 to spend you'll normally get derisory levels of CS. If you've got £50,000 to spend they'll personally lick your exhaust pipe clean! Not a pretty sight, but something they're all trained to do. (Ling excepted of course!) :)
     
    Posted: Jan 24, 2008 By: Chippie Member since: Jan 3, 2008
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  13. Fuzzy

    Fuzzy UKBF Legend Free Member

    5,365 506
    I hear what you saying, (well can't as I have lost my hearing,:rolleyes:,) but I get what you are saying :D

    Yeh, it was a bit off putting, the first question someone says is "What's your budget", agree, a better idea is to be shown a portfolio, state how much it costs and then ask.

    I was just curious guys, I certainly don't want a website that costs a few pennies, at the end of the day you get what you pay for. :D
     
    Posted: Jan 24, 2008 By: Fuzzy Member since: Oct 20, 2007
    #13
  14. Sally@CC

    [email protected] UKBF Newcomer Free Member

    872 26
    If the first question is 'what is your budget' I immediately feel like I am going to be conned - sorry but I do.

    Why can't you ask, what do you want and then give a quote which includes a couple of options (£1500 for this or £800 for that). We can then pick the option that fits our budget. We know the £1500 will be a better site but that way we dont feel as though the cost has been made to fit our budget, no matter how much is involved.
     
    Posted: Jan 24, 2008 By: [email protected] Member since: Oct 17, 2007
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  15. Jeewhizz

    Jeewhizz UKBF Newcomer Free Member

    691 69
    I have asked that question in the past due to people thinking that we'll knock up a site for £200! I generally start off by saying that we're very experienced, and that experience comes at a price. That usually sets the tone :)
     
    Posted: Jan 24, 2008 By: Jeewhizz Member since: Aug 27, 2007
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  16. RayB

    RayB Banned

    6,474 242
    I never give my budget figure to a potential supplier - it might be too high :D That said, I do try to prepare a thorough brief and I'm prepared to pay to get the job done properly.

    I also have ongoing relationships where work is charged on trust to an agreed hourly/day rate.
     
    Posted: Jan 24, 2008 By: RayB Member since: Nov 12, 2006
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  17. Interconnect IT

    Interconnect IT UKBF Ace Free Member

    1,244 195
    I must admit, that we ask if the client had any thoughts about budget after we've discussed typical costs.

    We show prospects through a range of sites in our portfolio, and without fail you see their eyes light up when they see our most expensive sites. But most can't afford those - sadly!

    Also, perhaps sadly or not, we're a company of geeks. We're not natural sales people. In fact, having to talk to people just feels like it gets in the way of getting on with coding and doing cool stuff! The best clients, to be honest, are the ones that come to us because they already 'get it'. We're getting more and more like that, and reducing our general sales effort. Productivity is growing, and stress is dropping :eek:)
     
    Posted: Jan 24, 2008 By: Interconnect IT Member since: Nov 15, 2007
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  18. Chippie

    Chippie UKBF Newcomer Free Member

    805 140
    I agree entirely about being asked for my budget Sally because I feel that way too. However, as someone who quotes work on a daily basis I have a problem with your solution. If I had to quote 2 or 3 options on every job I would feel justified in charging a fee to quote the work. Why should I spend 2 or 3 times longer doing the quote when only 1 price can ever be accepted. I would only be able to do one third as many quotes a day and this would ultimately have a knock on effect with my bottom line. In other words if I have 1 in 3 quotes accepted and can do 21 per day I would be booking in 7 jobs per day. If those 21 quotes represented 7 quotes each with 3 options, then with the same booking ratio I would only book in 2 per day! Not good busioness even if it would make the odd customer feel warm and fuzzy! :)
     
    Posted: Jan 24, 2008 By: Chippie Member since: Jan 3, 2008
    #18
  19. RayB

    RayB Banned

    6,474 242
    Well, that is just a good sales tactic, warming up for the close, or the alternative close. You may be better at sales than you think :)
     
    Posted: Jan 24, 2008 By: RayB Member since: Nov 12, 2006
    #19
  20. rjharrison

    rjharrison UKBF Newcomer Free Member

    152 14
    Amen to that!

    I suppose there are more subtle ways to get to the point of "what is your budget?" but I agree with InterconnectIT - that you want to find out the client can afford you sooner rather than later.
     
    Posted: Jan 24, 2008 By: rjharrison Member since: Jan 3, 2008
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