A must read - GROW your own Carrot

Status
Not open for further replies.

lockie

Free Member
May 4, 2007
1,358
313
Well this thread has certainly provoked some thought for me.I now realise how much im looking long term without any clear short term goals. I learned this lesson along time ago in martial arts but had forgot recently till this thread reawakened it.
To do a thousand repetitions of a technique is quite daunting but if you break it down and think im going to do sets of twenty five then it becomes a lot more manageable and more importantly more achievable as its only now forty sets.

Thanks chris
 
Upvote 0
Well this thread has certainly provoked some thought for me.I now realise how much im looking long term without any clear short term goals. I learned this lesson along time ago in martial arts but had forgot recently till this thread reawakened it.
To do a thousand repetitions of a technique is quite daunting but if you break it down and think im going to do sets of twenty five then it becomes a lot more manageable and more importantly more achievable as its only now forty sets.

Thanks chris

Wonderful wonderful – you have made my day.

Yes short term goals are the new rock and roll. If you don’t set and achieve them then how can you ever get the long terms ones? There is another good point about short term goal setting and that is you get to celebrate more often. If I was trying to climb Everest I would have as many camps (goals) as possible on the way to the summit so I could open a bottle of champagne to celebrate as I got to every one.

Chris Kaday
 
Upvote 0
...you get to celebrate more often. If I was trying to climb Everest I would have as many camps (goals) as possible on the way to the summit so I could open a bottle of champagne to celebrate as I got to every one.

Now there's a reason to set short term goals if ever there was one :D.
 
Upvote 0

stephendoyle

Free Member
Mar 7, 2007
683
40
Manchester
thats right.

one of the things that i am learning with the book is to give myself recognition for a job well done and for results that i get.

we are all too critical at times on ourselves.

i now realise that is important to celebrate at certain points & mile stones that we set.

After all we are a lot nearer achieving our goal! :)

regards
steve doyle
 
Upvote 0
Yes absolutely Steve - a great insight

Setting those milestones, making them as clear as possible and above all really celebrating when we achieve them really is the key to staying motivated on the way to achieving a really big goal. In NLP they call it chunking down – basically breaking up the goal into small achievable bits and achieving them one at a time, one before the other. Of course this is obvious but you have to enter into this thoroughly to get any benefit from it for otherwise the goal just remains a big unstructured, unspecific mess.

By the way when reading your posts I really get from you a strong sense of 'discovery' as the way you progress and achieve.

Chris Kaday

thats right.

one of the things that i am learning with the book is to give myself recognition for a job well done and for results that i get.

we are all too critical at times on ourselves.

i now realise that is important to celebrate at certain points & mile stones that we set.

After all we are a lot nearer achieving our goal! :)

regards
steve doyle
 
Upvote 0
I would like to know how other readers of your book get on.

Regards
Steve Doyle


Yes so would I Steve. The majority of the Test Team we used in the book to prove the process actually achieved or got very near their goal. However I have to admit that was to some extent due to the coaching and cajoling of myself and Bob the coauthor. The processes work – no doubt - but not if the book sits on the shelf.

I have also offered to support anyone’s goal journey as they go through the processes in the book too. Now that’s more than you get with the likes of Nigella Lawson. If you buy her book and your soufflé does not rise, then tough luck! However few people take this up. Shame really.

Chris Kaday
 
Upvote 0
Great Jamie - well done

Will send a copy of the book to you if you PM me an address

In the opening chapters you will find ways of making this goal even clearer and more definable

Chris Kaday

Hi,
Thanks for the chance to get a copy of your book for free. I always like to read others books as its good to get someone else’s perspective on something. Especially if it is different from your own as that’s when growth happens and new ideas and understanding created.
Ok I hope its clear enough….

My goal is to have the city centre cafe re-launched by 1st Dec. To commit to a marketing campaign, to raise the brand and shop location. With increased foot traffic through the door, increased staff motivation, improved stock presentation including cross-promotion at point of sale and increased outside catering to increase the cafe's turnover by 1/3 over a 6 month period.:cool:

Jamie
 
Upvote 0
Before this becomes too much of a love fest, let me disagree with something. :)

one of the things that i am learning with the book is to give myself recognition for a job well done and for results that i get...we are all too critical at times on ourselves.
While I do agree that it's important to set goals and deadlines, I don't believe in doing anything that takes off the pressure. For me, my company's mission is an obsession and something I shall never lose sight of. No, I don't give myself recognition, and I am increasingly critical of myself. It drives me forward. It forces me to get better. It keeps the sense of urgency and drive. As far as I'm concerned, I'll always be too critical of myself because I need that.

I'd view giving myself recognition as either complacency or boastfulness, and I don't agree with either one.
 
Upvote 0
I don't believe in doing anything that takes off the pressure. For me, my company's mission is an obsession and something I shall never lose sight of. No, I don't give myself recognition, and I am increasingly critical of myself. It drives me forward. It forces me to get better. It keeps the sense of urgency and drive. As far as I'm concerned, I'll always be too critical of myself because I need that.

I'd view giving myself recognition as either complacency or boastfulness, and I don't agree with either one.


So it’s obsessive, relentless, pressure, driving and forcing you urgently forward with increasing self criticism and no respite to recognize and celebrate what you have achieved eh? My - what a lot of joy you must be missing? I am sorry to sound so critical Steve but your post makes me feel incredibly sad tonight.

Chris Kaday
 
Upvote 0
There is one thing that I noticed in my past career is that if you do a job well, you go un-noticed, and you hardly get any recognition for what you do. Do a job bad and you get noticed. Now that I'm my own boss rewarding yourself and the people that work for you as a team and as an individual is good for motivation, self esteem and clearly puts the goals that you have ahead of you in perspective. It makes you feel good as a person, but also what you have achieved as a business.

Julian
 
Upvote 0
There is one thing that I noticed in my past career is that if you do a job well, you go un-noticed, and you hardly get any recognition for what you do. Do a job bad and you get noticed. Now that I'm my own boss rewarding yourself and the people that work for you as a team and as an individual is good for motivation, self esteem and clearly puts the goals that you have ahead of you in perspective. It makes you feel good as a person, but also what you have achieved as a business.

Julian

Right on target Julian. People largely change jobs due to lack of recognition which is both sad and avoidable as acknowledgment and recognition cost nothing just a little thought and time.

Chris Kaday
 
Upvote 0

lockie

Free Member
May 4, 2007
1,358
313
I have to agree with you games4business as its something my last employer was all too good at doing.So many times i challenged management to "catch me doing something good instead of something bad". It seems many work places are too busy looking for mistakes rather than good results or work.

Ive started forming some new "mini goals" to do achieve by the end of the year and also had a reality check to how things are really going as ive doubled my turnover this year without realising it. Its so easy to lose touch with the reality of our own situations in business. I suddenly feel like ive done a few "sets" already with this realisation.
 
Upvote 0
So it's obsessive, relentless, pressure, driving and forcing you urgently forward with increasing self criticism and no respite to recognize and celebrate what you have achieved eh? My - what a lot of joy you must be missing?
Honestly, I don't miss out on joy at all. It's just that, to really really achieve some goals can take herculean effort. I push myself to the limit, and I won't accept anything less than the best from myself. And I mean that: I won't accept anything less than the best from myself. I don't want reward, and I don't want self-congratulation. I strive for the satisfaction and joy that comes from knowing that I made a difference and helped to realise a vision. Anyway, it's far more satisfying to focus on others than on me.

Also, don't get me wrong. I am very encouraging to my team, and I help them to recover from occasional mis-steps. While I expect everyone to do their best, I try to help when they run into problems. For myself, though, no self-congratulation. I believe in our mission statement, and I'm going to keep pushing myself to get there.

Yes, maybe I am an oddball, but I believe we get out of things what we put into them. I try not to waste a single minute of any day but to always do something productive. We've been allotted our time on this earth, and I'm going to put it to the best use possible. Congratulating myself is not part of that because it's taking my eye off the goal.
 
Upvote 0

jamie850

Free Member
Oct 15, 2007
26
0
Edinburgh
I try not to waste a single minute of any day but to always do something productive. We've been allotted our time on this earth, and I'm going to put it to the best use possible. Congratulating myself is not part of that because it's taking my eye off the goal.

Steve, I'm not sure if your joking or not, but just remember one thing - you can't take it with you.
To spend your life chasing just one thing to the exclusion of all others seems like a waste of life.:eek:
 
Upvote 0
Thanks Chris!
Hopefully in 6 months I can come back to this thread and say that I achived my goal. Now that would be great.
Jamie
That would be wonderful Jamie. One of the best parts of writing the book was seeing the Test Team we set up achieve their goals. The book literally changed lives and habits.

Chris Kaday
 
Upvote 0
Steve, I'm not sure if your joking or not, but just remember one thing - you can't take it with you.
To spend your life chasing just one thing to the exclusion of all others seems like a waste of life.:eek:
I'm not joking at all. I appreciate the sentiment, but I manage my time pretty well (even when spending time here!). The one thing you can be sure of is that I don't waste a minute, let alone a life. :) On the contrary, I set long-term goals and do my very best to meet them. That long-term view is important. None of us wants to look back in later years and think what more we could have achieved if only we'd been more focussed.

Nothing worthwhile, though, comes for free. I don't watch TV, and all my free time is spent with my family. I work until midnight most nights and extensively at weekends. I don't treat myself, I don't congratulate myself, and I don't take time off (except with the family - and I make a point of taking each child on a 3-day excursion from time to time). I'm fortunate to have achieved a number of milestones in life, and I plan on achieving more.

When I look at the biographies of many of the Victorians, I'm always impressed with what they achieved. Henry Stanley, for example, sailed the Atlantic as a youth, fought on both sides in the US Civil War, was famous for his expeditions to find Livingstone and to Sudan and his trips down the Congo river, later became an MP, and much much more. Also, look at Richard Burton (the explorer, not the actor!) and others. They achieved so much by being very focussed. I doubt they stopped much to congratulate themselves.

I don't think we disagree on much here. My comment was that I don't find it useful to congratulate myself on meeting milestones; on the contrary, I keep pushing myself to do better. That's always been my way, and it's served me well. We get out of things what we put into them, and I put in my all.
 
Upvote 0
If I was trying to climb Everest I would have as many camps (goals) as possible on the way to the summit so I could open a bottle of champagne to celebrate as I got to every one.
Maybe I can use your example to make the point more clearly.

Climbing to the top of Everest is a lofty goal (literally!). It's something that only a small percentage of people in the world are willing to attempt. It demands years of training and preparation and a long-term commitment. Those in training sacrifice daily and forgo many other things. They always believe they can do better and push themselves to the limit. To achieve a goal like that, you have to. You must choose your 'baggage' carefully.

It's OK to set intermediate milestones en route to the top, but it would be foolish to stop and enjoy a bottle of champagne every few hours (I know you didn't mean it literally). Not so much progress would be made even if you stopped to congratulate yourself all the time. The point of a milestone, in this case, is to have something specific to shoot for: Ten intermediate steps are more attainable than one huge step. (This is why some people I've worked with in the past refuse to take a toilet break until they've finished a particular task. No matter how much squirming it takes, they're determined to meet the milestone - although maybe the sense of relief is their self-congratulation!)

What I was trying to say earlier is that, to achieve much, you really have to be focussed. I'm climbing my own Everest right now. I've already climbed many foothills, but I see the discipline needed to scale Everest. The only thing, though, is that my Everest has ever-increasing peaks - so I may never actually get there. At each milestone, I look to see what could be done better and continue on my way. This is the only way to reach great heights. If I drank champagne at every stop, I'd lose my sense of direction (again, literally!).
 
Upvote 0
Status
Not open for further replies.

Subscribe to our newsletters


Real community whatever your business.
Sign up to our full membership View Documentation

About us

  • Our community has been around for many years and pride ourselves on offering unbiased, critical discussion among people of all different backgrounds. We are working every day to make sure our community is one of the best.

Quick Navigation

User Menu