£500-£800 for e-commerce site to be designed?

Discussion in 'Ecommerce Forum' started by Personalised Place Cards, Jul 24, 2015.

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  1. Will_Authentic_Style

    Will_Authentic_Style UKBF Contributor Free Member

    99 19
    £800 is very cheap. £2000 is pretty cheap too for something totally bespoke.

    Say the company's rate is £50 per hour, that's 40 hours for the £2000 option, and for something totally bespoke, you can't do it in a week.

    Choosing the right company for you really depends what you want to achieve and where you are at with your business. If you want to get up and running quickly and test the water selling your product, you're probably best off going the template route, so that would be quotes of£800 and under most likely.

    The companies who have quoted you should be explaining their process to you as well, so you should have a very good understanding of all the steps the project will go through. If they haven't - ask them to do so. :)
     
    Posted: Aug 4, 2015 By: Will_Authentic_Style Member since: Jun 13, 2012
    #21
  2. leshka_uk

    leshka_uk UKBF Newcomer Free Member

    12 1
    when i needed to do my site I got design done by designcrowd co uk and found freelancer peopleperhour com to configure simpleservers co uk/magento-hosting

    you can also check understandinge com
     
    Posted: Aug 5, 2015 By: leshka_uk Member since: Sep 9, 2014
    #22
  3. Audrey Wright

    Audrey Wright UKBF Contributor Free Member

    75 26
    Be very VERY weary of designers and developers who offer you work on the cheap.

    Most of the times it's beginners like me, who're not yet experienced and confident to ask the real price for their labour. Often times they will make mistakes, which will lead to big problems later on.

    The other type is people who know how to make something fast and make it look like it's working great, but it wont. They will get the money and leave you a barely functioning site which might explode the next time you change a font size or resize an element.
     
    Posted: Aug 5, 2015 By: Audrey Wright Member since: Jun 25, 2015
    #23
  4. Will_Authentic_Style

    Will_Authentic_Style UKBF Contributor Free Member

    99 19
    Fair points above ^^^

    Lots of business owners just see the upfront cost (e.g. £800 or £3000), not what's being offered after everything is complete as well.
     
    Posted: Aug 5, 2015 By: Will_Authentic_Style Member since: Jun 13, 2012
    #24
  5. fisicx

    fisicx It's Major Clanger! Staff Member

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    There is nothing wrong with a cheap low cost website. It could be a toe in the water experiment so see if an idea works or a niche product that sells itself.

    Many people leap in a spend a lot of dosh on a site without doing the necessary market research (using a cheap wordpress site and Woo for for example). One chap I know spent £3000 on a site that looked stunning but didn't sell a single product because he had no money for marketing.
     
    Posted: Aug 5, 2015 By: fisicx Member since: Sep 12, 2006
    #25
  6. Alan

    Alan UKBF Legend Full Member - Verified Business

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    Of the few ecommerce sites I think are good I have asked the owners what they paid and generally it has been in the range of £20,000 to £30,000

    So whilst you can get ecommerce sites from £350 upwards, and if youre serious thinking of only spending £800, I'd ask why wouldn't you just use Shopify or Bluepark and buy 26 months of a decent site for your £800 whilst you learn about e-commerce.

    When you have a viable business, the spend £30k.
     
    Posted: Aug 5, 2015 By: Alan Member since: Aug 16, 2011
    #26
  7. webstore

    webstore UKBF Enthusiast Free Member

    702 106
    I fully agree with fisicx. For example a Magento online shop (as with other OpenSource solutions) can be built in a couple of hours using a suitable off-the-shelf graphic template of which there are hundreds available from various suppliers.

    However, where the time & cost clock up (client side or developer side) is adding product data/images & info pages. Even when product data is imported there's still a lot of work getting that product data upload-ready and lots of configurable, grouped, bundled products can create even more time & costs preparing that data.
     
    Posted: Aug 7, 2015 By: webstore Member since: Nov 7, 2010
    #27
  8. Alan

    Alan UKBF Legend Full Member - Verified Business

    6,194 1,716
    Devil is in the detail. OP said they had quotes for design, but is that what they mean, or do they mean designed, developed, populated with bespoke photography / words appropriately SEO'd, integrated with their other business systems such as accounting / POS / stock control and implemented including training in use.

    Does the OP already have a brand / style and is the designer just having to follow that, or is the designer expected to create a brand / colour pallet / logo / typography to be used across both print and online media?
     
    Posted: Aug 7, 2015 By: Alan Member since: Aug 16, 2011
    #28
  9. Aaron Yates

    Aaron Yates UKBF Newcomer Free Member

    19 2
    Make sure you have a watertight contract as any liability is going to be your own once the website is handed over (Data Protection Act, PCI-DSS, and all other legal responsibilities). Not to mention keeping the site secure/up-to-date with patches.
     
    Posted: Aug 11, 2015 By: Aaron Yates Member since: Aug 11, 2015
    #29
  10. Alan

    Alan UKBF Legend Full Member - Verified Business

    6,194 1,716
    Your post doesn't make much sense.

    No developer (in their right mind) will give you a contract that protects you from you future business liabilities caused by your legal responsibilities in operating a business.

    All developers should actually get a project release signed off on deliver that basically says you have tested and accepted the website and anything you discover in the future is your problem.

    Mind you, at £800 level I doubt any contracts change hands at all. Its just done on a quote / versus payment.
     
    Posted: Aug 11, 2015 By: Alan Member since: Aug 16, 2011
    #30
  11. Brad Houston

    Brad Houston UKBF Newcomer Free Member

    3 0
    I'd say that's a very good price, it's around what I charge for a bespoke WooComnerce website.
     
    Posted: Aug 11, 2015 By: Brad Houston Member since: Aug 11, 2015
    #31
  12. RedEvo

    RedEvo UKBF Legend Free Member

    6,007 1,533
    Using low-cost freelancers can work (£800 type stuff) but the adage buy cheap, buy twice is very likely to be the reality. Services like Shopify and squarespace allow anyone to create a very nice template based ecom site for thirty bob and a fried fish with all the tricky stuff taken care of. However, making the site work and getting it to deliver value is almost never cheap and it's never easy.

    IMHO e-commerce success requires money and at least some luck :)

    d
     
    Posted: Aug 11, 2015 By: RedEvo Member since: May 12, 2007
    #32
  13. Aaron Yates

    Aaron Yates UKBF Newcomer Free Member

    19 2
    Llocally - If you read my post you'll see that's exactly what I said.

    If you are having an agency build your website you should contractually expect it to be legally compliant and secure on delivery/transfer of ownership, because after that the liability and responsibility is yours.

    A business buying from an agency is highly unlikely to be an expert in the minefield of risk related to website ownership. You are paying the agency for their expertise, and to do the job correctly.

    How does a small business owner know how to test a website for security vulnerabilities, legal compliance, etc. at handover? If you were buying a BBQ gas canister from B&Q, wouldn't you expect the seal on the canister to be tested when you buy it? If you buy a new house, wouldn't you expect it to comply with building regs?

    From my experience of the digital marketing industry at large there are many service providers/agencies that themselves have no understanding of these risks, so are (without even realising!) selling their clients a liability. The product simply isn't legally compliant or secure when it leaves the door, so the client unknowingly pays potentially good money to adopt a significant risk.

    This said, many smaller agencies often don't have/offer a contract, which can often make things a little interesting when a dispute arises.

    --- Edit:
    My apologies if this came over as aggressive. Aspects of how the digital marketing industry operates is a particular bug bear of mine.
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2015
    Posted: Aug 12, 2015 By: Aaron Yates Member since: Aug 11, 2015
    #33
  14. fisicx

    fisicx It's Major Clanger! Staff Member

    30,238 8,881
    I disagree. Compliance is the responsiblity of the owner not the developer. If they ask me to install a widget or an image it's not my job to check up on the legality of doing so. If they want a specific plugin installed I'm not going to spend my time checking up on vunerabilites.

    I will point out potential pitfalls but there is no way I'm going to accept responsibility for a security issue or non-compliance.
     
    Posted: Aug 12, 2015 By: fisicx Member since: Sep 12, 2006
    #34
  15. Aaron Yates

    Aaron Yates UKBF Newcomer Free Member

    19 2
    As long as you point out the pitfalls you've done your bit. If you're responsible for choosing the image then naturally you should investigate the copyright/licencing obligations. Legal compliance (Companies Act, PECR, Equalities Act, Data Protection Act, etc.) for published acts is definitely on the agency at launch.

    ---Edit:
    That said, compliance to the CAP Code/ASA is always on the site owner, as they will have to provide you with the copy for the site. Doesn't hurt to point this out to the client.
     
    Posted: Aug 12, 2015 By: Aaron Yates Member since: Aug 11, 2015
    #35
  16. fisicx

    fisicx It's Major Clanger! Staff Member

    30,238 8,881
    Nope. Not at all. If you ask me to put your VAT number in the footer I will do so but I'm not going to be responsible for ensuring YOUR Equalities Act compliance. It's YOUR content, all I'm doing is providing the container for that content.
     
    Posted: Aug 12, 2015 By: fisicx Member since: Sep 12, 2006
    #36
  17. Aaron Yates

    Aaron Yates UKBF Newcomer Free Member

    19 2
    Ok, just to check here, I assume you are aware of the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG from the W3C). Either that or the Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI).

    If you're building web services for the UK Government this is a mandatory requirement. Search Google for "UK WCAG" and hit the first link for more info.

    These are the guidelines that ensure websites are accessible to the visually impaired? The container you build for the content your client supplies (alt tags on images), etc., is important. As such, there's nothing your client can do about it. Failure to ensure a website is accessible is technically a breach of the Equalities Act.

    Couple of quick and easy questions:
    -- Were you aware of WCAG?
    -- Are you putting clients in breach of the Equalities Act?
     
    Posted: Aug 12, 2015 By: Aaron Yates Member since: Aug 11, 2015
    #37
  18. fisicx

    fisicx It's Major Clanger! Staff Member

    30,238 8,881
    Yes I am aware of the initiatives but if the client wants a site all in shades of pink with tiny 8pt fonts then that's what I will build for them. It will fail the accessibility tests but I cannot be held responsible to failure to meet any legislation.
     
    Posted: Aug 12, 2015 By: fisicx Member since: Sep 12, 2006
    #38
  19. Aaron Yates

    Aaron Yates UKBF Newcomer Free Member

    19 2
    And do you prominently advise your clients that you're not building them a legally compliant website? This has nothing to do with aesthetics, it's about how the site is fundamentally built. If it fails WCAG do you make this and the potential risks clear at handover?

    I'll provide a comparison. If you went out tomorrow and bought a brand new car, would you expect it to be completely road legal at time of purchase? Let's say you're pulled over by the police after 5 minutes of driving and it turns out the tyres are bald. You might have heard in passing that this will attract 3 points and a penalty, but you expected the vehicle to be road legal, right? Surely, it's brand new! You might demand the dealer provide you with a bright pink car with cream leather interior, but you still expected it to be road legal, regardless of aesthetics, yes?
     
    Posted: Aug 12, 2015 By: Aaron Yates Member since: Aug 11, 2015
    #39
  20. fisicx

    fisicx It's Major Clanger! Staff Member

    30,238 8,881
    But this isn't a car. And the accessibility guildelines are just that. They are not legally binding. I can't think if any legislation that obliges me to ensure compliance. I can point to a whole loads of government sites that aren't compliant - even gov.uk fails some of the tests.
     
    Posted: Aug 12, 2015 By: fisicx Member since: Sep 12, 2006
    #40
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