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Targeting decision makers with Youtube ?

Discussion in 'Sales, Marketing & PR' started by Scott Millar, Sep 26, 2016.

  1. fisicx

    fisicx It's Major Clanger! Staff Member

    Posts: 25,664 Likes: 7,608
    My cousin is a BBC cameraman. He doesn't use a smartphone. I've just spoken to him (in Austria doing a report on something) and he just laughed at the suggestion this is common practice.

    PS: Just had a text, reporters are trained to use a smartphone but only when they have no other means of recording, eg: when they are first on the scene at an incident. But they are told not to do any interviews until the cameraman and soundrecordist get there.
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2017
    Posted: Jan 4, 2017 By: fisicx Member since: Sep 12, 2006
    #41
  2. The Byre

    The Byre UKBF Ace Free Member

    Posts: 5,011 Likes: 1,994
    Now you are just babbling - and wandering far, far away from the purpose of this thread (which, if you can caste your mind back that far, was about reaching decision-makers!

    Sterling Uni uses old kit (Old Kitt, gadd, how I loved that woman!) and that is why the images looked ropey. I've got old SD cameras that cost many thousands, that, when displayed on a modern 4K monitor, look laughable. So what? Cameras are the cheapest part of video today.

    Also you can get a new car for £30k, you certainly cannot get a video studio of any quality for £30k. Even the microphones cost about £1k each and you'll need a cupboard full of those. As for grips, just price up some Vinten or Sachtler tripods with fluid heads and a professional set of dimmable LED lights with video studio (i.e. not DMX) controllers and all the stands and gantries required. Then there is the cost of audio post production rooms - now go and price up a smaller, modest 5.1 monitoring system from Neumann or Genelec.

    Just five modest and fairly cheap camera stands with monitors and foldback will cost all of your £30k. The comparison is absurd!

    Just because one £200 DSLR gave you great footage when viewed on a domestic telly, does not mean that it can be used in a TV studio, for a whole variety of technical reasons, such as lack of word-clock and features such as white-balance and a compression-free output.

    I suppose you will next be telling us that we can all start a taxi company, by tying two bicycles together!
     
    Posted: Jan 4, 2017 By: The Byre Member since: Aug 13, 2013
    #42
  3. The Byre

    The Byre UKBF Ace Free Member

    Posts: 5,011 Likes: 1,994
    BBC reporters have to know how to do all sorts of things, including how to upload footage from anything and FTP that footage back to base. That does not mean that it is now policy to use iPhones as standard ENG kit.

    If you want proof, start with one simple question - how do you add time-code to an iPhone stream, so that it can be used for a live fly-away gig?

    Do you want me to go on? How about focus pulling on an iPhone?

    Have you actually read the tech specs for footage for the BBC? Rummage about on their website and see if you can find them, then come back and tell me that you know how to get the output from an iPhone to comply with them!

    Babes and sucklings!
     
    Posted: Jan 4, 2017 By: The Byre Member since: Aug 13, 2013
    #43
  4. webgeek

    webgeek UKBF Big Shot Full Member - Verified Business

    Posts: 3,579 Likes: 1,332
    This was referring to mobile reporting, not studio shooting. Yes, expecting a reporting to go into a studio to shoot on an iPhone would be absurd. That's called the straw man fallacy, a classic logical fallacy where someone (you) attempt to make up some crazy crap and then point out how absurd it is. The problem being, the crazy crap had nothing to do with the point.

    The points are simple:
    1) You can shoot good enough video to succeed using an iPhone
    2) The BBC uses iPhones for mobile reporting


    @fisicx - the aussies are only 10 years behind, so give them time - they'll catch up with the UK eventually.

    Try reading a bit before discarding this truth:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/collegeofjournalism/authors/c643d2d4-b619-33fb-8ec1-1bb9864c0561
    (that's an entire bbc blog dedicated to how to use the iphone for their reporting/journalism)

    or
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/collegeofjournalism/entries/513cd882-ea41-4a59-b692-149f03be5d8d

    and if you don't like Mark Settle, then how about Nick Garnett pointing it out:
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/collegeofjournalism/authors/23901193-fccb-3601-a58e-a59390f69592

    Nicks personal site is **loaded** with examples of BBC using iphones for reporting using iphones:
    http://nickgarnett.co.uk


    In fact Nick spent a year doing reporting exclusively using the iPhone based kit for the BBC:
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/collegeofjournalism/entries/046f6a9d-c9e3-4067-bdb0-342a5ec52bab


    Four years ago this tech was being used for reporting:
    https://www.journalism.co.uk/news/f...sm-from-bbc-5-live-s-nick-garnett/s2/a551533/

    Since then it has proliferated.

    https://www.journalism.co.uk/news/iphone-apps-for-journalists-mobile-reporting/s2/a550885/

    http://mediashift.org/2015/04/lessons-learned-after-5-years-of-iphone-reporting-for-radio/ (temp offline)
    -----------

    When you discount the truth, get caught out being uninformed, then try to cloud the issues rather than researching and admitting, you end up losing more face than you could possibly gain.

    Sorry Byre and fis, you've both lost a ton of brand equity and shown how far out of touch you are with the reality...

    Never fear, you there's till time to recover rather than rambling on and confirming what we already suspect.

    Bring some facts instead of ad hominem attacks - another form of evading truth by attacking the person rather than the facts.
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2017
    Posted: Jan 4, 2017 By: webgeek Member since: May 19, 2009
    #44
  5. fisicx

    fisicx It's Major Clanger! Staff Member

    Posts: 25,664 Likes: 7,608
    Austria not Australia - and he is a BBC cameraman.

    You said: 'The BBC have virtually eliminated their production and editing crews, relying on reporters with iPhones to carry most of the load'

    That's not correct. While smartphones are used by lone reporters, that doesn't mean it's normal practice for most reporting.

    And if you read the Nick Garrett blog posts he uses a lot more than just an iphone. For example:
    '...but as my bag held all my broadcast kit: a satellite transmitter, an ISDN codec, cables, microphones, headphones, an iPad, mic adapters and enough chargers and batteries to keep everything powered up'
    http://nickgarnett.co.uk/project/paris/
     
    Posted: Jan 4, 2017 By: fisicx Member since: Sep 12, 2006
    #45
  6. webgeek

    webgeek UKBF Big Shot Full Member - Verified Business

    Posts: 3,579 Likes: 1,332
    It's all revolving around the iPhone. Of course he uses additional kit, he's got to get the video/audio sent in for syndication.

    Sorry about the Australia confusion. I can't say why in Austria they aren't using such, other than the fact that you may be speaking to studio reporters who don't go into the field. It's a bit like asking a Vodafone mobile salesman in the nearby mall why your Vodafone broadband is slow. They know phones and would know baud from a frog.

    FYI, the rest of the world is using iPhones for journalism as well (like the Wall Street Journal putting 400 WorldStream reporters in the field using smartphones)
    http://reutersinstitute.politics.ox...are-changing-journalism-practice-21st-century

    It is interesting that some reporters are using a hybrid approach, with DSLR sometime, iPhone the rest, so that they get the action shot feel during cutaways.
    https://www.journalism.co.uk/news/d...ra-for-a-mobile-phone-for-a-month/s2/a660935/

    Also interesting that two stations each broadcast a full 24 hours of MoJo using their iPhones:
    https://www.journalism.co.uk/news/t...ith-24-hours-of-mobile-journalism/s2/a631124/


    Bottom line: iPhone can shoot good enough video for MANY BBC reporters, and should be good enough for the OP as well.
     
    Posted: Jan 4, 2017 By: webgeek Member since: May 19, 2009
    #46
  7. The Byre

    The Byre UKBF Ace Free Member

    Posts: 5,011 Likes: 1,994
    You remind me of a teacher talking to his class that I overheard at the CeBIT trade fair in Hanover. He pointed to a terminal that was linked to four giant water-cooled mainframes for a truly breath-taking flight simulator on a huge screen and told his class "You see here what one can do nowadays with a simple and small PC!"

    So here is a story for you -

    A long time ago, about 20 years ago, I attended a conference for news gathering called Newsworld in Berlin. All the good and great were there, including a few from the UK, who were a bit put-out, as nobody knew who they were, with the exception of Martin Bell (White Jacket Man) who was known slightly from a few reports that the BBC had sold to other stations and networks.

    The big news in the news industry back then, was the new generation of small digital cameras, like the Sony D1000 and the Panasonic EZ-1. One of the star turns was a bloke nobody outside of the UK had heard of, called Brian Blessed (I remembered the name however from Z-Cars!) who had just been up Mount Everest with a Sony D1000 and gave us all a talk about his experiences with the camera and the new digital DV format.

    Also there, was one revolutionary news reporter called Michael Rosenblum, who had just received an Emmy for a report he had done from a Palestinian refugee camp for 60-Minutes on CBS. Instead of the usual Sony Digi-Beta or Beta-SP, he opted for a domestic Hi-8 video camera, so as to not create a fuss. Today, Rosenblum runs RosenblumTV and has inspired thousands of VJs around the World.

    All the 'shirts' had their collective noses put out of joint by Rosenblum, who told them that they were all wrong in their desire to have large professional cameras and five- or ten-man crews.

    "It used to be OK!" he shouted at Martin Bell. "We used to go news-gathering, using little 16mm Arriflexes, but now you need a moose to carry one of today's cameras!"

    "I need a full crew and a steady and well-framed camera shot!" shouted Bell back at him. "These new toys will never get into mainstream broadcasting for just that reason!"

    I joined in with this shouting match and told Bell that we shall be buying Panasonic EZ-1s just as soon as they come out, as they were so small and were brilliant in low light. "Ideal for covert shooting!"

    I accused Bell of wanting to turn a simple news shoot into a media event, with the reporter making himself more important than the story!

    "A reporter has to be clearly identifiable in a war situation!" shouted Bell.

    I told him that having some reporter poncing about in a war zone made those situations even more dangerous than they needed to be and told him of my experience as a soldier in the Paras.

    Bell gave me a full-blast couple of minutes, on the importance of reporters being where soldiers did not want them to be.

    "Yer, but you's don't need to stand out like a sore thumb to do it!" shouted Rosenblum. "You're a dinosaur! You's guys are dead!" he shouted in his brilliant New York accent. "You's all dead - it's just that nobody's told you yet! Well, I'm telling you now!"

    Later that evening, I had dinner with about ten others, including Rosenblum, Christiane Amanpour (CNN and later 60-Minutes) and Cokie Roberts (ABC News) who later met my Great Dane called 'Viscount Field Marshal Montgomery' and loved him! The table talk was all about the new ways of news gathering.

    Amanpour was delighted with that afternoon's shouting match. "It was most entertaining!" she said and laughed.

    Robb, if I were still in the ENG game, I would stick a couple of GoPros on my head for half the stuff we were later to do with our EZ-1 cameras (one of which I still have!) All you need is a GoPro and the framing marked out on a pair of glasses, so that you get shots framed correctly.

    GoPros are ideal, because you can stream them to an SSD and get truly great quality footage.

    Sadly, mainstream broadcasting does not work like that. They still want to use cameras that have to be carried by a moose, to use Rosenblum's turn of phrase. They still want three-point lighting where possible and either a Sennheiser 416 mics with a Rycote 'meerkat' covering them, or a DPA lapel-mic.

    GoPros and iPhones are great for covert or just inconspicuous footage, but that does not mean that every shoot can be done with an iPhone on a stick.

    So please do not tell me that I am uninformed or out of touch with reality. Whereas you may have heard something from someone and have obviously understood half of it, this topic is my back yard.
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2017
    Posted: Jan 4, 2017 By: The Byre Member since: Aug 13, 2013
    #47
  8. The Byre

    The Byre UKBF Ace Free Member

    Posts: 5,011 Likes: 1,994
    This BTW, shows how little you understand of the subject. There is almost no broadcast syndication in the UK, that is a very US way of selling programmes. BBC news broadcasts are never syndicated, but remain within the BBC.
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2017
    Posted: Jan 4, 2017 By: The Byre Member since: Aug 13, 2013
    #48
  9. webgeek

    webgeek UKBF Big Shot Full Member - Verified Business

    Posts: 3,579 Likes: 1,332
    Syndication means more than just sale to distributor stations in a network. Syndication is what blog owners do when they post to their site then make mention, with a link, on their social accounts. Syndication is what journalists do when they take their content and upload it to the HQ intranet so it can go through editorial processes before broadcast.

    If you broaden your mindset, expand your vocabulary and accept that some people have truths beyond your current position, you've got a good chance of growing personally - a good thing.
     
    Posted: Jan 5, 2017 By: webgeek Member since: May 19, 2009
    #49
  10. webgeek

    webgeek UKBF Big Shot Full Member - Verified Business

    Posts: 3,579 Likes: 1,332
    I can appreciate that your mind is made up and that you don't want to be confused by the facts, which were contained in the many, many facts and links to them provided above. FYI, the links I posted were relating to hundreds of reporters using iPhones for MoJo (mobile journalism) - admittedly a new thing that you've obviously missed, having spent much time at dinner parties with big whigs.

    Clearly the adage that you can't teach a dog new tricks is founded in the realities of today.

    Bottom Line: iPhones are good enough for the OP, just like the BBC, Wall Street Journal, Reuters, and many many many more.
     
    Posted: Jan 5, 2017 By: webgeek Member since: May 19, 2009
    #50
  11. The Byre

    The Byre UKBF Ace Free Member

    Posts: 5,011 Likes: 1,994
    One of my sons calls it 'manplaining' (a man explains!) and that happens when a man who knows absolutely not one thing that he is talking about and has only heard something from somebody that he really did not understand anyway, then decides to explain God and the World about that subject to anyone unfortunate to have to listen.

    The good part in that, is the fact that that particular son is one of the worst 'mansplainers' on Planet Earth and even explained to me how films and TV programmes are made and who does what on a set. To give you an example, he had never heard of the Dolby 'Atmos' system, but when I tried to explain it to him, he told me that I had got it all wrong!

    He programmes industrial robots, so no doubt, if you met him, he would explain to you how to build business charts and diagrams and you could explain to him how to programme robots!

    You two in a room would make the perfect couple!
     
    Posted: Jan 5, 2017 By: The Byre Member since: Aug 13, 2013
    #51
  12. webgeek

    webgeek UKBF Big Shot Full Member - Verified Business

    Posts: 3,579 Likes: 1,332
    Thanks Byre, you've made my day. I'm sure your son is a wonderful guy.
     
    Posted: Jan 6, 2017 By: webgeek Member since: May 19, 2009
    #52