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Targeting decision makers with Youtube ?

Discussion in 'Sales, Marketing & PR' started by Scott Millar, Sep 26, 2016.

  1. The Byre

    The Byre UKBF Ace Free Member

    Posts: 4,431 Likes: 1,811
    Irritated by the running about (20 second intro!) the glaces off-camera and the repeated 'erms', I stopped the tape at one minute, when you told me that 20% of ten-times £15 x 12 comes to "about £400" - Ouch!

    The very core of your pitch is how much money I could save - yet you get the sum wrong. And not just any sum, but one that any technically literate person should be able to do in their head. The calculation boils down to 2 x 18 x 10 which, the last time I counted rocks, comes to 360.

    (This whole thing is wasted on me, as, when MS went subscription, our policy of zero debt meant that forking out £15 per calendar month per workplace was out of the question. We have an absolute ban on subscription SW.)

    Then you are giving away something from Google, but you do not explain what it is or why it would be nice to have one.

    You have a good on-camera presence and unlike me, you have hair, which is always a plus!

    Also, the more informal approach will work in your area and in IT generally and is to be commended, but I would lose any gimmicks that reminds me of the kiddie programmes on BBC Alba (apart from the brilliant Eòrpa, not a station to be emulated!)

    Also you shot yourself from below and far too close up, which makes you appear threatening. Shoot full-on, fairly loose and level, or very slightly from above. Never use a wide angle lens for a H-n-S shot!

    A straight-forward head-n-shoulders to camera, perhaps with your workplace in the background, showing test equipment or similar gubbins to give the viewer the impression of technical competence.

    On lighting, keep it bright and get someone else to operate the camera and lighting set-up. Remember that video flattens the face, in the same way that being on stage reduces the un-made-up face to a skin-coloured and featureless blob. On stage, we use make-up to sculpture the face. With a video interview, we use lights to rebuild the face.

    Cold (i.e. daylight or slightly blue) back-light and warm fill light is the usual setup.

    Here's a brief how-to I found on YT -



    When you are selling something, your video MUST be cheerful and bright - it ain't no horror movie! But you still have to sculpt the face back to life!

    So in future, when you watch TV, start to think about where they put the lights and how did they get that 'look'. In particular, look at US shows. British TV is usually very poorly framed and lit. Look at the lighting and framing for shows like Gotham and CSI New York. Think about how they got those effects. These are master classes in cinematography.

    If you want to learn about lighting for camera, start by looking at the great masters of lighting and framing, such as Rembrandt, Vermeer, Turner, Caravaggio and in particular Edward Hopper. Suddenly, every scene in every movie will make aesthetic sense. You will begin to understand the how and why of the imagery and lighting in 'The Road to Perdition' or 'Saving Private Ryan' and even your simple head-n-shoulders pieces will (we hope!) improve greatly!
     
    Posted: Oct 29, 2016 By: The Byre Member since: Aug 13, 2013
    #21
  2. Scott Millar

    Scott Millar UKBF Contributor Free Member

    Posts: 48 Likes: 8
    Thanks for the info Byre. I wish I had the time to do a pro video setup. I do have good friend that have a video production business so may employ them for one or two "special videos".
    I've still been pumping out the videos on almost a weekly basis. My youtube channel now stands out at over 300 subscribers which I think is a good starting point.

    [link removed]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 3, 2017
    Posted: Jan 2, 2017 By: Scott Millar Member since: Mar 13, 2016
    #22
  3. The Byre

    The Byre UKBF Ace Free Member

    Posts: 4,431 Likes: 1,811
    It took 40 seconds for you to get to the point! How about just four seconds? It took a massive 1:40 to get to number two.

    There are three big security threats to your business. One - phishing emails, two, hacking your content management system for your website and three, calling up your own email provider and asking for a password reset.

    There! I managed to name all three and write them down in less time than it took for you to speak out the three types! It took you three-and-three-quarter minutes for you to name all three - that is a very low information density, considering that you still have not explained the nuts and bolts of how these things are done in close to four minutes!

    All that staggering about on the beaches of Aberdeenshire, doing a selfie video does not seem to me to be relevant to the task of corporate IT protection. If you were explaining something about hypothermia in water (I've been in that water and it is always freezing!) I would 'get' it, but it does seem to me to be relevant to hacking of websites and emails.

    Sorry to be negative (again!) about your video, but you are trying (I assume) to project an image of corporate competence and that means making a competent video. I've explained above what I think would be a better approach and building your own lighting rig involves three stands, three PAR-cans with cheap halogen bulbs and three dimmers. Total cost about £200 and HD cameras cost almost nothing!
     
    Posted: Jan 2, 2017 By: The Byre Member since: Aug 13, 2013
    #23
  4. Scott Millar

    Scott Millar UKBF Contributor Free Member

    Posts: 48 Likes: 8
    Thanks for the feedback I love getting critical feedback as it helps me improve. I'll see what I can do for the next one.
     
    Posted: Jan 2, 2017 By: Scott Millar Member since: Mar 13, 2016
    #24
  5. Alan

    Alan UKBF Big Shot Full Member - Verified Business

    Posts: 4,390 Likes: 1,213
    I don't think you answered the question 'decision makers of what sort of company you are targeting? ' I have in my career been an IT decision maker in corporates, and if I saw your videos they would definitely help me decide - instantly no!

    I also have been a micro sized business owner for the last 8 years ( and know nothing about marketing otherwise I would be a medium sized business owner by now ) and I couldn't stomach more than a few seconds of each of your videos, just didn't do it for me.

    I would say, you have some great advice here, but my personal advice is
    - don't learn how to do video production, it is a technical skill, outsource it
    - don't waste time talking to 300 non decision makers on YouTube, get out there and talk 'live' to real decision makers
     
    Posted: Jan 2, 2017 By: Alan Member since: Aug 16, 2011
    #25
  6. Scott Millar

    Scott Millar UKBF Contributor Free Member

    Posts: 48 Likes: 8
    Interesting Alan. Appreciate the feedback. Why would it be an instant no ?
     
    Posted: Jan 3, 2017 By: Scott Millar Member since: Mar 13, 2016
    #26
  7. soundengineeruk

    soundengineeruk UKBF Regular Free Member

    Posts: 291 Likes: 55
    Watching a few more of your videos from your website, has left me confused about what it is you are trying to be achieved. S

    Yes, information is there, however the main questions from a decision maker would be
    • Why should I trust your company?
    • How does this apply to my business?
    • How much is it going to cost me?
    Me personally, winning the trust of the client (decision makers) can be time consuming; more than YouTube video can do; especially the ones who have had rough ride like bad advice, poor return on investment, don't trust technology etc...

    I agree with Alan get out and speak to business decision makers as they are you voice. Majority of my clients come from recommendations. From my own experience the right attitude, personality along with quality solutions has worked for me.

    As for your YouTube videos, creatively they are OK, but I don't see the current form has a future, especially with the number of views you are getting on recent upload (1 month) like 38, 33, 30, 17, 360 along with 314 subscribers.

    In fact the most views come from reviews like Acer Aspire, BT Infinity etc.. So maybe if you want to promote your company is not to promote it directly. Have a logo in a corner and/or link in the video to your website.
     
    Posted: Jan 3, 2017 By: soundengineeruk Member since: Jul 25, 2012
    #27
  8. Alan

    Alan UKBF Big Shot Full Member - Verified Business

    Posts: 4,390 Likes: 1,213
    From a corporate point of view, I'd instantly be turned off by the amateur nature of the video presentations. Others have covered what is amateur, from lighting to sound to script to message. It would convey you are a one man band or ultra micro and not successful enough to afford professional help. As a corporate buyer, a key aspect in outsourcing something as critical as IT support is sustainability of the business, ultra micro businesses are too risky - e.g. what happens when the owner is ill?
     
    Posted: Jan 3, 2017 By: Alan Member since: Aug 16, 2011
    #28
  9. The Byre

    The Byre UKBF Ace Free Member

    Posts: 4,431 Likes: 1,811
    A guy with an iPhone on a stick is not a corporate video!

    Scott, you are in Aberdeen, home to the UK's oil industry. Around that industry are all kinds of feeder companies doing anything and everything from multi-media links to off-shore, to tools supplies, temp staff, geological surveys, you name it and it's there. These people are not Highland folk who accept that things can be a bit make-shift.

    Imagine you are running a geological survey department and IT security is vital. It just takes one employee with a memory stick to download everything and ruin the entire company and bring a multi-billion dollar enterprise to its knees. Just one!

    Now ask yourself - would you trust the task of corporate IT security to a guy with an iPhone on a stick?

    What you have there is what the Germans call an 'Armutszeugnis' - a certificate of poverty. Either corporate videos are extremely professional and slick, or they are destructive.

    A poor video damages the company.
     
    Posted: Jan 3, 2017 By: The Byre Member since: Aug 13, 2013
    #29
  10. fisicx

    fisicx It's Major Clanger! Full Member - Verified Business

    Posts: 25,008 Likes: 7,381
    Why are these the security risks of 2017 as they aren't anything new? And to tell me I will be hacked this year is wrong. And you say you have a blog post with patch information but I couldn't find it.

    It doesn't really convince a potential client you know what you are talking about.
     
    Posted: Jan 3, 2017 By: fisicx Member since: Sep 12, 2006
    #30
  11. webgeek

    webgeek UKBF Big Shot Full Member - Verified Business

    Posts: 3,359 Likes: 1,239
    1) The BBC have virtually eliminated their production and editing crews, relying on reporters with iPhones to carry most of the load. I believe the intel on this as it came from a BBC reporter who has to shoot his vids with an iPhone (2016 intel).

    2) In case you haven't seen the videos Microsoft does on their developer networks, or HubSpot does when they do 'live' website reviews (which aren't really live, but that's beside the point), these are shot with decent gear, but could be done equally with with a couple hundred Pounds of basic camera/phone without a bunch of fancy editing, transitions, or props.

    The Microsoft team has three guys standing talking back and forth in what looks a bit like an American football halftime show. The HubSpot team has a couple of guys on a couch, which if they go over on time for their slot, get pingpong balls thrown at them by the camera/sound guy (who doesn't move the camera or adjust the sound - he's more of a manual teleprompter really).

    ----

    You don't need 20K in equipment to look professional, and you don't have to be the best thing since sliced bread.

    That said, you need to have a decent speaking voice, no annoying mannerisms, get to the point and make the benefit of what you're sharing so obvious that a 10 year old would get it. Do those things, and it won't matter what gear you've got. After all if that poopie guy on youtube can make millions, it doesn't take Pulitzer prize winning content to bring business your way with video.
     
    Posted: Jan 4, 2017 By: webgeek Member since: May 19, 2009
    #31
  12. fisicx

    fisicx It's Major Clanger! Full Member - Verified Business

    Posts: 25,008 Likes: 7,381
    But this thread is about targeting decision makers not about making a how to or info video. If Scott want's to attract new leads this is the way to go
     
    Posted: Jan 4, 2017 By: fisicx Member since: Sep 12, 2006
    #32
  13. webgeek

    webgeek UKBF Big Shot Full Member - Verified Business

    Posts: 3,359 Likes: 1,239
    Actually, it's about fast moving, informative videos that are high level and not too technical. The prospective viewership is decision makers.

    However, you can't put a video out that will only be seen by decision makers. There is no target filtering on youtube, so that's just a red herring.

    What he's described is top of funnel stuff that's broad and will appeal to a large audience, hopefully some of which are decision makers.

    Also, the HubSpot example is targeted at website owners and marketing managers, aka decision makers, so they hit the mark perfectly. The Microsoft example revolves are developers from low to high and are frequently viewed by decision makers at manager and c-level in software development organisations.
     
    Posted: Jan 4, 2017 By: webgeek Member since: May 19, 2009
    #33
  14. The Byre

    The Byre UKBF Ace Free Member

    Posts: 4,431 Likes: 1,811
    Robb, there is just no nice way to put this - you are talking absolute and utter drivel!
    You can accuse the BBC of many things - too many to list here! - but making their reporters use iPhones really ain't one of them! Your informant sounds like some idiot you met in the pub and not someone who has worked for or with the BBC!

    1. The production and editing work is either done in-house or commissioned from reputable post production companies. Production, electronic news gathering (ENG) and editing are three different activities. If you have reported the words of your informant correctly, I can only deduce that neither you nor your informant have the slightest notion of what you are talking about.

    2. In your neck of the woods, Scotland, field work (i.e. ENG work) is mostly done by staffers around the cities, close to the broadcast hubs, or further afield, by freelancers. They all use professional Sony HD cameras and Sennheiser 416 mics with Rycote windjammers. Some of the footage you get to see in Scotland is of low quality, not because the BBC is using iPhones, but because the terrestrial data links to Inverness and elsewhere need to be upgraded. When possible, the satellite trucks in the field link directly to Glasgow, or for national UK news, London or Manchester.

    3. Yes, it can happen that a reporter finds him/herself somewhere out in the sticks without a field crew and uses an iPhone to report from some war zone or emergency, but that only happens in extreme circumstances. Even in war zones, there are local crews, usually with links to Reuters, able to do a head-and-shoulders for a BBC or freelance reporter. These crews also use Sony HD cameras and Sennheiser 416 mics with Rycote windjammers.

    If you re-read what I wrote, you will see that, that is precisely what I stated. It takes effort and application to the task at hand to look professional. The OP is using an extremely slap-dash approach and in doing so, is damaging his company.
    That and only that is the underlying issue here. Making goofball, iPhone videos is just about the worst way of achieving this goal.
     
    Posted: Jan 4, 2017 By: The Byre Member since: Aug 13, 2013
    #34
  15. webgeek

    webgeek UKBF Big Shot Full Member - Verified Business

    Posts: 3,359 Likes: 1,239
    I had dinner with a BBC reporter who stated this as a fact to me less than 2 weeks ago.

    Sorry if you don't believe it, but I've known him longer than I've been a member here. Believe it or not - it's true. Maybe not every reporter, but it's true of bunches.


    Check their academy for instruction on how to use iPhones in reporting:
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/academy/journalism/article/art20130702112133386
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/academy/journalism/article/art20130702112133395

    Welcome to the new world order :p
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2017
    Posted: Jan 4, 2017 By: webgeek Member since: May 19, 2009
    #35
  16. webgeek

    webgeek UKBF Big Shot Full Member - Verified Business

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    FYI, when working for a company in Stirling, we shot a video (a 30 second commercial using green screen) with the University's media lab equipment, which reportedly cost enough to buy a decent new car. Simultaneously we shot the vid with a 200 quid Kodak camera that happened to also shoot video. We also used a small action cam made for strapping to a skydiver helmet.

    The action cam scored lowest, with artifacts and washed out colour.

    The university equipment scored middle of the pack with sharp outlines and mediocre colour.

    The Kodak smoked the other two, having outrageously stunning colour and crisp outlines.

    Sorry, but if a 200 quid camera can outperform a 20k bit of university media kit the gauntlet is thrown. Amateur gear can produce professional results, especially if you're shooting things which don't include large motion areas like the fans in a packed football stadium. It's just like HD vs SD - you only see the diff in certain circumstances.
     
    Posted: Jan 4, 2017 By: webgeek Member since: May 19, 2009
    #36
  17. The Byre

    The Byre UKBF Ace Free Member

    Posts: 4,431 Likes: 1,811
    And sound and lighting? What did this numbskull claim the BBC's choice of equipment was there? A candle and a hearing-aid valve?
     
    Posted: Jan 4, 2017 By: The Byre Member since: Aug 13, 2013
    #37
  18. webgeek

    webgeek UKBF Big Shot Full Member - Verified Business

    Posts: 3,359 Likes: 1,239
    Posted: Jan 4, 2017 By: webgeek Member since: May 19, 2009
    #38
  19. fisicx

    fisicx It's Major Clanger! Full Member - Verified Business

    Posts: 25,008 Likes: 7,381
    How is this proof?

    I'm sure there are occasion when a smartphone is all you have but it's the exception not the rule.
     
    Posted: Jan 4, 2017 By: fisicx Member since: Sep 12, 2006
    #39
  20. webgeek

    webgeek UKBF Big Shot Full Member - Verified Business

    Posts: 3,359 Likes: 1,239
    FFS - a BBC reporter said they are required to do so for mobile reporting assignments (on location), their website has training on how to do it, and that's no enough proof.

    I'm sure they're training their reporters for something they'll never do - NOT.

    Why the negativity and the naysaying - have you got any proof to the contrary? Any at all?

    Man - the pure negativity without knowledge is stifling.
     
    Posted: Jan 4, 2017 By: webgeek Member since: May 19, 2009
    #40